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Can you paint a fire door with normal paint?

Ignatius Lord Offline Mute
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02-02-2012,09:47 PM
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I have a fire door panel (Blank) and it doesn't look too nice. I want to paint it but have been told it could destroy its fire rating, is this true? If so what paint can be used.

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Michael_Brown Offline Mute
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03-02-2012,08:22 AM
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Yes I am sure you can. We have never been pulled by a building inspector (when involved) on this. I can understand your line of thought. To make them appear better we usually use wooden beads to form panels before painting.
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Simon Topple Offline Mute
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04-02-2012,01:31 AM
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Where possible go for six panelled fire doors. They are far more aesthetically pleasing - less institutional.
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paul_barrett Offline Mute
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04-02-2012,04:10 AM
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Intumescent paint is the stuff to use.

Putting  normal flammable paint on a fire door will reduce the fire rating unless the correct paint is used.

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harry_dewick-eisele Offline Mute
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04-02-2012,11:13 AM
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You can paint fire doors as desired. There is no evidence to suggest that over painting of the door or of fire door seals has any detrimental effect on the ability of the door and seals to perform efficiently.

re the fire door seals:

There are some benefits in over painting the seals as they are less likely to absorb atmospheric moisture. However, there are limits on how much paint can be applied without there being a risk of the seal being rendered inoperative. It is recommended that over painting be limited to a maximum of five coats of conventional oil bound paint or varnish. When preparing a frame for redecoration, the use of heat or chemical strippers should be avoided if intumescent seals are incorporated. If seals are damaged by either of these processes, they should be replaced. If glazing beads have been painted with intumescent paint, it is essential that they should be repainted with a similar paint.

Harry

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Paul_Fenton Offline Mute
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05-02-2012,12:37 PM
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I understand that acrylic  gloss paint is water based and any solvents disipate during the drying process so this type of paint is non flammable . Also the doors come fire rated so fire rated paint is not required.   

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jack_jones Offline Mute
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05-02-2012,01:54 PM
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Why not just check stuff like this with the local governing bodies? that way you get a definitive answer form those people who would decide if they were to prosecute you or not if the worst happened?

You could then post your answer here in order to help the community. If you choose not to do that,In light of the conflicting advice here, and potential outcome of getting it wrong - why not just paint it in fire resistant paint?

Im just wondering though how resistant fire-resistant paint would prove to be though in a blazing inferno? Im not sure it would make me feel too much safer - but maybe it affords major protection though?

I was once asked, years ago, by a tenant what steps they should take n the event of a fire. I explained that they should take long and fast ones - towards the nearest safe exit

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Gordon Howes Offline Mute
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05-02-2012,04:52 PM
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Couldnt agree more with the sentiments of Jack Jones above. Its okay getting differing opinions but just go and see the local authority who will say yes or no. Then you know for sure in case of a prosecution.

Then we will all know what the official answer is!!

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paul_barrett Offline Mute
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05-02-2012,06:34 PM
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Fire doors and their circumstances can be complex; but even your standard door that is not fire rated will always assist in preventing fire and smoke spread; I speak as an ex-fireman having to deal with flashovers and backdraughts.

Firefighting  and rescue is made so mush easier if people just shut their normal doors, particularly at night.

That is why you always get advice about making sure you shut all doors if possible before leaving a fire scene.

Believe me it is much appreciated by the guys and gals who have to go in and deal with the fires etc........so no more wedging those fire doors open eh!!?Jack Jones said:

Why not just check stuff like this with the local governing bodies? that way you get a definitive answer form those people who would decide if they were to prosecute you or not if the worst happened?

You could then post your answer here in order to help the community. If you choose not to do that,In light of the conflicting advice here, and potential outcome of getting it wrong - why not just paint it in fire resistant paint?

Im just wondering though how resistant fire-resistant paint would prove to be though in a blazing inferno? Im not sure it would make me feel too much safer - but maybe it affords major protection though?

I was once asked, years ago, by a tenant what steps they should take n the event of a fire. I explained that they should take long and fast ones - towards the nearest safe exit


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