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  • LHA/Universal Credit

    Benefits tenants: tips and tricks?

    Yeh I understand where you are coming from, seems logical. 

    Notice I did say 'I'm not ready...' implying that I may consider it in future, just not right now. One step at a time!

    I've made one leap already by considering benefit tenants. Who knows when/if I go the full hog.

    But in your example, if that happens, that is when the guarantor is called in right? I really don't want to be dealing with the council.


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    I hear you and yes  its a big leap so good luck if you decide to dive in

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    Jonathan Clarke. http://www.buytoletmk.com

    Pick / Find a good tenant and you’ll have no problem, it’s just an unfortunate fact of life that the proportion of the unreliable type is greater in the benefit dependant sector.
    Over the years I’ve had quite a number, a single mum that turns up on time, is neat and tidy ( but not in their saturday night finery)is a good start. , be wary of obviously new clothes ( dss have been known to give discretionary payments for a prospective tenant to turn up looking presentable and not stinking of cannabis). Big giveaway for me is the state of their teeth and how bad their breath is.
    Then just chat with them for 15 minutes or so, soon see if they have communication skills and drop in a few questions about where they’ve lived before , places they might frequent etc. If you’re a local too its pretty easy to get a mental picture of how they live.
    For the most part its easy to find a perfectly pleasant and capable tenant who as a result of their circumstances is simply better off on benefits. 
    Avoid like the plague any approach from council offering to find you a tenant, i soon realised that was the start of the road to ruin.
    Applicants invariably late for appointments
    Liable to burst into tears whilst asking for a new start in life
    Have the weirdest excuses for just about everything
    All had an air of complete disarray about them
    Even got asked for the bus fare home from one.

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    If they have lived locally or have family locally, that's a good sign. They are familiar with the area and want to be close to their network.

    If they have children, it's a good sign. Nobody really wants to swap their kid from one school to another every 6 months. You want stability.

    If they have a part-time job and have held it down for at least 4 months, that's a good sign.

    If they ask if they can paint/decorate the property up to their liking, that's a good sign. (You would say, not in the first 6 months as you want to see how they settle in.) Because most standard AST the landlord will not allow a change from their white walls. No tenant would decorate or make something a home if they weren't thinking long-term.

    ----

    Just remember the person walking in on day1 will have one set of circumstances, but when you evict them those things that held them together may have changed through no fault of their own (job loss/benefit withdrawal ,relative dying etc).



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    People are losing their jobs left, right and center. A working tenant today could easily be claiming benefits tomorrow.

    If you are a landlord with multiple properties whether you like it or not at some point you will have a tenant on benefits !


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