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  • Property-a-holics

    Concern About Boiler in Bedroom

    My qualifications are that

    1. I had a friend who died of CO poisoning at 21 in his house

    2. My boiler blew up in my house 

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    Actually it's bathroom that's one of the places where I believe you can't have a boiler. I could be wrong as I'm not an expert but I'm pretty certain that's written down somewhere.

    Bedrooms are fine with modern boiler like others have said because of the way they are built.
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    Saagar

    Disclaimer: I have no legal expertise nor am I a qualified advisor on any subject. A humble landlord using an open forum to exchange ideas and experiences. 

    No. Bathrooms are legal too. 

     I have bought two horrible houses with Gordon Brown inspired boilers in the bathroom  Both legal. Both beyond belief in terms of their appearance and pipework that looks like an early 18th century steam engine.

    Both houses passed muster with the surveyor and I got mortgages on both before renovation.  I kept both boilers and relocated them to the kitchen where they are still performing well.

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    First of all I'd say move your CO alarm at the head height or bed height ish. Since it's a kid living in the room I'd imagine you'd need to lower it because I imagine your boiler is mounted and if you've placed it above that then it might be too high up. I don't know if the CO gas rises quickly so it's better to make it easily detectable by placing it a height where the person is most like to breathe it in. 

    These detectors make a very loud noise if a leak is detected. This I think that should be assuring enough for you that you've put sufficient measures in place. Lots of people sleep with boilers in the bedroom. 

    Besides that like others have said - have a vented window but it's not a mandatory requirement. I'd also encourage to have a process such that the tenant confirms on a monthly basis that they've tested the alarm. This is part of tenants responsibility anyway but you could agree with them that for your peace of mind you'd like a monthly confirmation.
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    Saagar

    Disclaimer: I have no legal expertise nor am I a qualified advisor on any subject. A humble landlord using an open forum to exchange ideas and experiences. 

    I know new builds here require window vents in all windows of a flat where there is a gas boiler and also a ventilation shaft to provide fresh air into the room where the boiler is. It may be worth checking the regs for new builds in the UK and trying to meet them as close as possible. You may not be able to do some things physically, but you should be able to get close, which will give you peace of mind. And from what I remember from chemistry, CO is heavier than oxygen and stays on the ground, gradually building upwards, but its been years since Ive been at school!

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    NO!!!!!!! follow the manufacturers instructions re where to locate.

    (which generally say ABOVE the height of any opening door or window, because being slightly less dense than air that is where CO collects.)

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    DISCLAIMER just my personal opinion - for legal advice consult a qualified professional grown-up.

    The very best protection measure is to have the appliance safety tested every year.

    After that a CO alarm is an extra added 'seatbelt'.

    Given that it's a modern room sealed boiler - and you're doing the two above things - you're reacting to a very small perceived risk rather than a real risk.

    The 15 y/o is much more likely to be involved in an RTA than suffer any ill effects from your boiler (when you're doing the two above things)

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    DISCLAIMER just my personal opinion - for legal advice consult a qualified professional grown-up.

    Thank you to all of you who responded directly to the concern I raised and offered factual, helpful and useful information.  I appreciate it and my mind is at ease now.


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    As a Gas Engineer I can assure you that all modern boilers are room sealed and may be installed in a bedroom.  

    It is not the preferred location as the constant turning on and off during the night can be a nuisance.

    However they are completely safe.

    On the odd occasion a landlord insists on the bedroom location and although we advise of the noise issue sometimes they insist.

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