X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Property Training/Mentoring

    Conmen/women and Trading Standards

    To suggest that there is a plethora of conmen and conwomen providing training and mentoring in the UK is a gross understatement.

    Fortunately my short arms and long pockets have meant that they have never had any of my money.

    I am curious as to whether Trading Standards or any similar body have ever been successful in investigating and leading a prosecution against any of them in the UK.

    If not, I am interested in why not and what can be done to draw the attention of the authorities to the various rogues, tricksters and charlatans out there.

    Any thoughts and comments appreciated.

    0
    0
    It's a tricky one, because these folk are providing the training they claim the payment is for, the fact that it is either flawed/ineffective is debatable.

    Years ago when I was starting out I attended a "free" course and signed up to their membership of sourced properties, indeed went as far as paying them for one, however I did not use their recommended solicitors despite the pressure to do so.  I discovered that the property had structural faults they claimed to be unaware of, and was significantly overvalued compared to others nearby and they used a well known estate agents to come up with this ridiculous valuation.... 

    They did refund me the fee but of course I was out of pocket with my legals. 

    The company in question still operates and still sends me details of sourced properties in either dreadful locations or multi million pound properties both unsuitable to the target audience at their courses and all of them vastly overvalued. But are they conmen? They offer everything they claimed but the fact the service is expensive and ineffective doesn't make it fraudulent.
    1
    0

    Thanks John, I wonder if their credentials, as articulated by them when you met them were true.

    A quick check of companies house data behind many of the high profile trainers on the circuit today often shows the reality to be very different from how they describe themselves.

    0
    0
    Oh they check out ok and run their own estate agency too. They weren't blatantly promising instant riches but certainly charmed a lot of folk into buying property in really bad spots in the country.

    Definitely need to drain the swamp but these folk are generally not lying, it's just not all the facts a bit like the old time share...."It's a lovely apartment yours for two weeks of the year...." (November or February...)
    0
    0
    That industry thrives on people that are eager to get rich quick and flash a false luxury lifestyle on social media/friends/family without ever putting in real hard work.

    The same people then realise that it's all a big con too late and are left in debt and with all kinds of financial & emotional  problems.

    No one is ever willing to then speak up about it and not many believe them when they do!

    The very science behind the con is designed to isolate victims from anyone that would advise against spending money on such mentoring and courses. They also operate with small print and parameters that make the law hard to enforce on them.

    It's a very sad situation taking over more than we realise or want to admit!

    I went to x3 top conferences within 6 months this year and all were brainwashing sessions that led to a very pricey up-sale onto a mentoring academy. Hundreds of people joined!
    1
    0

    Would be a tough one for trading standards as the "guru" can simply blame the "mentee" saying that they didn't implement the training.

    I think the best chance would be the Advertising Standards Agency if dubious claims were made at point of sale.
    1
    0

    That's a good point you raise, and it should not be too difficult for such an organisation to capture all the recorded hyperbole of the fraudsters on the likes of 'youtube' etc and then compare it with reality.

    Added to this, such an organisation could also seek comment from those who have been scammed to bolster their evidence I guess.

    Seems that this is happening on a massive scale, yet nothing is happening to address it.

    0
    0

    If you haven't already have a watch of this 'The Contrepreneur' and follow Mike Winnet as he goes undercover.

    He is currently undercover in a number of 'property guru' and 'weath creation' seminars and facebook groups following what they preach and putting it into action and reporting on his findings.

    Will be interesting to keep an eye on him and see who he exposes in due course following his investigations.

    0
    0

    When Ben Rogers conned £2 million out of people who trusted him, with his litany of lies and bullshit,  the Serious Fraud office were not interested.  It took the single minded determination of a couple of people over a period of many months to get the Police interested.  And then it took another two years of constant nagging to keep them interested.   Luckily one very smart PC got hold of the case and ran with it.

    Ben was made bankrupt in May 2014.   Five years later there has still been no prosecution and no pay out for the creditors.  Because the con is complex and a mix of property investment and unsecured loans, often for fictitious investments. the police can't be bothered. After all, no one got hurt, no one was stabbed.

    Ben spent the money that one lady had saved for her terminally ill husband's funeral, on a holiday.  She thought he was investing it to give her a return to pay for her husband's care.

    Ben has not shown an ounce of contrition or remorse.  In his mind he's done nothing wrong.   He really is a piece of shit.

    If anything the authorities have conspired to profit from Ben's criminal activities.  The first tranche of recovered  money went to HMRC,  the second to the Trustee who has made an absolute packet out of the case.  Then there's the legal advice and the estate agent fees and the capital gains tax and numerous other fees.  The Trustee has done an appalling job.

    In answer to the opening post,  this is never going to stop.  It is big business based on  gullible people who want to believe their guru or mentor, with a fervent fanatical belief that they have found the Holy Grail to instant riches.

    It's only websites like this that will at least give those researching the latest guru that may just save another poor sod losing their money.

    I went on this seminar many years ago.

    Just watch the first five minutes of this and see how the brain washing has already kicked in.

    1
    0

    Thanks for this, I have watched - very interesting.

    0
    0
    Well said sir...the 3 seminars I attended could have easily been an episode from Hustle or Oceans 12! The con is on...perfectly laid out from start to finish with all members of the team playing their parts to lure you in.
    0
    0