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  • Refurbish/Develop

    DAMP PROOF SPECIALIST WANTED

    Rich,
    Thank you for further advice, it will all be very useful for future reference. I am minded to add "no external render" to my "do not buy list" as it certainly seems to cause/cover water ingress problems that could be avoided/more easily identified and treated if it were just plain brick work.
    Regards
    Steve

    Richard Greenland said:
    As I said in one of the earlier blogs, chipping off plaster to 1.2 M above ground, waterproofing the wall and re-plastering including a water-proofing agent in the sand and cement render will normally stop rising damp appearing in the room. As Nick suggests, people often get confused about the real source of the damp. I disagree about silicone injecting not working, it often does but they will likely have to come back to do a few spots where the treatment hasn't fully taken. Also some substrates aren't amenable to injection. If there is wet clay for instance, no amount of injection will work as there's no space between the microscopic particles for the silicone to go.
    All the best,
    Rich
    Fed up with HIGH PROPERTY MAINTENANCE COSTS? Follow my weekly blog at https://pimlico-flats.co.uk/
    Trading as https://www.absolutely-brilliant-properties.co.uk/
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    Could be worse it could be built of Straw and on mud foundations! Richard Greenland said:I remember you saying your house is built on mud, Nick, without foundations :o and I can also imagine some numpty coming round and saying the mud should be injected. Entirely pointless of course, and expensive. All the best, Rich REPAIR-FREE RENTALS blog, building-in low-maintenance to rental property, is at https://pimlico-flats.co.uk/ I’m looking for large buildings to convert to flats, or sites for up to eight resi units in Bristol/ Bath/ Shepton Mallet area. Terraces or semis, GDV >£180K per unit. I’m contactable at https://www.absolutely-brilliant-properties.co.uk/ or on 07773047223.
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    Rich,
    Thank you for the clarification re source first ventilation second. I understand what you are saying and will have all the advice in mind when I go up there next week. All being well I should be meeting up with Peter and Nigel's people next Weds.
    I spoke to the guy that had done the quote I posted earlier and asked him about a guarantee. He said a guarantee on the materials used would cost about £30 (recourse via the manufacturer) and a 30 year guarantee on the work would be 7.5% of the cost of the works. I have not come across this before but I assume that if a guarantee was offered as part of a quote these kind of figures would just be included in the price? He was asked to keep the costs to a minimum so I can see why there is no mention of insurance in the quote. Clearly I will be paying for a guarantee this time and I would think the guarantee on the work would be the best option.
    Would you agree and do the prices quoted sound reasonable? They do to me.
    Thanks
    Steve
    Richard Greenland said:
    Stephen, nothing wrong with external render or no external render. The point is that the outside walls need to be in good condition and as impervious as possible to water penetration. Having render or pointing in good condition helps. Not having gutters spilling over the walls, roofs or pipes leaking into the walls, or wet soil stacked high against the walls all help.
    By advocating ventilation in your earlier post you are in danger of closing the gate after the horse has bolted. As I said in my last blog, ventilation is very much a second-line of defence. Your first line should be preventing moisture getting into the house in the first pace. You do this using barrier methods as described in the earlier blogs. And by keeping all surfaces warm, which prevents undue condensation. As a rough guide, no house should ever become damp if left unoccupied. Dryness should be built-in and ventilation unnecessary.
    When the house is occupied occasional ventilation will be necessary, for instance when cooking or after bathing. Constant ventilation should be unnecessary and just makes occupants cold!
    All the best,
    Rich
    Fed up with HIGH PROPERTY MAINTENANCE COSTS? Follow my weekly blog at https://pimlico-flats.co.uk/
    Trading as https://www.absolutely-brilliant-properties.co.uk/
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    Rich,
    I will be insisting on an insurance backed guarantee from who ever gets the job. I had not realised that chances are the work would need to be revisited after a couple of months. Had I realised that I would have been more insistent on the refurb team coming back to do some more work. I assumed that it was down to poor ventilation in the main. The two situations have certainly taught me a few lessons.
    The most frustrating thing is how difficult it has been to get straight answers; should have posted on here months ago! Better to learn a lesson late than not at all.
    Again thanks for your continued advice.
    Steve
    Richard Greenland said:
    Steven, insurance backed guarantees are much more worthwhile as any company can fold, and these sort of companies frequently do if they get a lot of guarantee claims. It's likely you will have to call them back within the first few months as injection treatment is pretty hit-and-miss.
    I don't know how you could identify whether the fault was with the manufacturer or operative. This sounds like a recipe for getting into a situation where ea
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    Steve,
    As an incentive to the contractor, write into your agreement that there will be a retention sum witheld (5% is the norm) until such time as the insurance cover is in place. Its not un-common for these things to be promised, never materialise and then a problem occurs.
    Rob
    Sourcing genuine property deals in West Yorkshire
    Follow me on Twitter @walkerfox
    Read my blog https://walkerfox.wordpress.com/

    Steven Ball said:
    Rich,
    I will be insisting on an insurance backed guarantee from who ever gets the job. I had not realised that chances are the work would need to be revisited after a couple of months. Had I realised that I would have been more insistent on the refurb team coming back to do some more work. I assumed that it was down to poor ventilation in the main. The two situations have certainly taught me a few lessons.
    The most frustrating thing is how difficult it has been to get straight answers; should have posted on here months ago! Better to learn a lesson late than not at all.
    Again thanks for your continued advice.
    Steve
    Richard Greenland said:
    Steven, insurance backed guarantees are much more worthwhile as any company can fold, and these sort of companies frequently do if they get a lot of guarantee claims. It's likely you will have to call them back within the first few months as injection treatment is pretty hit-and-miss. I don't know how you could identify whether the fault was with the manufacturer or operative. This sounds like a recipe for getting into a situation where ea
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    Update
    Having visited Peterlee last Weds I now have a much better idea of what the issues are. Peter and Nigel's people turned up as promised and I am now waiting for quotes. Thank you again Peter and Nigel.
    As I suspected the damp in the semi has been caused by a number of factors and simply injecting the wall would not have fixed it. The big issue (cost wise probably) is that a number of wall ties have failed. In addition to that the flash bonding on the felt roof has not been bedded in to the main wall properly. Now that I have had a good look at the walls it is plain to see that wall ties have been a issue before as there are several areas of newer brick work. Now know what to look for, better late than never! I have insisted that the refurb company pay to have the felt roof sorted and they will be paying for the replaster and repaint. No idea how much the wall ties will cost to sort but I am getting the roofer I use to quote for that and the felt roof as well.
    GF Flat - The refurb company have agreed to redo the work on the penetrating damp in the kitchen and I have insisted that also redo the work in the bathroom as there is rising damp there. The black spot mould has now been cleaned off and trickle vents fitted to some of the windows (the tenant did not want them on all of them!) None the less they will be getting them fitted to them all over the coming weeks. There are 2 sets of starlings nesting in the roof due to the corner bricks on the top course being missing, no wonder water was getting in! Some of the pointing in the bottom course of bricks and the join between house wall and yard wall also need to be repaired. Getting local roofer to do that work.
    FF flat is OK but I will be getting trickle vents fitted to all the windows any way as there are condensation issues in the winter months.
    Thanks again for all the advice on this thread.
    Steve

    Rob Hubbard said:
    Steve,
    As an incentive to the contractor, write into your agreement that there will be a retention sum witheld (5% is the norm) until such time as the insurance cover is in place. Its not un-common for these things to be promised, never materialise and then a problem occurs.
    Rob
    Sourcing genuine property deals in West Yorkshire
    Follow me on Twitter @walkerfox
    Read my blog https://walkerfox.wordpress.com/

    Steven Ball said:
    Rich, I will be insisting on an insurance backed guarantee from who ever gets the job. I had not realised that chances are the work would need to be revisited after a couple of months. Had I realised that I would have been more insistent on the refurb team coming back to do some more work. I assumed that it was down to poor ventilation in the main. The two situations have certainly taught me a few lessons.
    The most frustrating thing is how difficult it has been to get straight answers; should have posted on here months ago! Better to learn a lesson late than not at all.
    Again thanks for your continued advice.
    Steve
    Richard Greenland said:
    Steven, insurance backed guarantees are much more worthwhile as any company can fold, and these sort of companies frequently do if they get a lot of guarantee claims. It's likely you will have to call them back within the first few months as injection treatment is pretty hit-and-miss. I don't know how you could identify whether the fault was with the manufacturer or operative. This sounds like a recipe for getting into a situation where ea
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