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  • Buy-to-Let

    Hypothetical question

    I know you are a tenant on benefits looking for somewhere to live in London.

    If your question isn't asking about improving the relationship between benefit tenant and landlord then perhaps you can explain why stopping austerity will have any effect on the relationship between landlords and non-benefit tenants? Why does this relationship need renewing?

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    Looking at it as a kind of knock on effect, with George Osborne's austerity measures put in place, with money being sucked from just about everywhere, if the austerity measures were lifted, would it mean the government would then have the financial resources to honour HB claims go live quicker? Possible improvements in the HB/LHA rates and improve communication between the landlord/tenant and claim honouring council?

    I am not a financial expert or anything like that, but as far as I can see since "austerity" raised its ugly head everyone seems to suffer both the landlord and tenants 

    I get that landlords are not running "free hostels" and to many it is a genuine buisness and also have bills that need to be paid, I get that and totally agree, and I also have seen in some parts of the country it can take anywhere in the field of up to six months to make a claim go live, if more money was put into the social housing situation, eg councils employing more people to clear the backlog of claims that are waiting to go live, wouldn't that benefit everyone? Reduce the numbers on benefits and back into work, speed up claim times, and improve the mental health situation in general this over a long period of time will actually improve everyone's situation.

    But I would really like to know who is actually benefiting from all these major financial cuts from the NHS emergency services and schools etc, where does all this money go?


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    As far as getting more people in to work - right now we have 25% plus of all workers just working part time (8 million plus workers) and with AI/Automation where would the extra jobs derive from when several University studies suggest automation could see 10 million jobs lost over next 10/15 years?

    Also remember it was a Labour Govt in 2008 which introduced capped LHA which overnight for new claimants put half of all private rental off limits on price - so is a potential new Labour Govt likely to make LHA more generous?

    Somewhat more likely via Lab Govt would be building more social housing - though that since 1977 has been allocated on needs-based criteria with single working age people at back of a long queue. Plus we cannot build as cheaply as we did back in 1940s/50s/60s when most existing social homes were built. For example a new build 2 bed HA flat in Surrey has rent £1000 pcm - still just within LHA rate but for true affordability it needs a tenant earning £35000 plus pa.

    It would also take some decades before a large volume of social homes was built - it took 35 yrs post WW2 to build around 5 million.

    DWP say 77% of the 4.7 million HB/LHA claimants are in workless households - so there is an argument for simply relocating such households to the cheapest locations - given that for the top rate of LHA in central London for 12 months you can buy outright a house in some parts of the UK. In practice the combo of LHA/OBC is already enacting that in a way as low income households are forced to relocate to places where the LHA shortfall is less than in London/SE - thus availing more disposable income. 

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    So given that it takes so long and expense to build homes in the traditional way, why not the next generation of "3-D Printed" houses, obviously it's not just a case of buying a flat pack house and hiring specialist engineering companies to assemble the units, but according to the research I have done, would you prefer to pay in excess of £250,000 for a pokey 2 up 2 down or pay £7,000 up for a flat pack home.
    But it seems, from a majority of people I have spoken too about this, there doesn't seem to be a solution to this housing/moving/on benefits problem, so how can I improve my chances of finding a landlord that is slightly sympathetic to the current situation? I personally have worked out a financial plan, although not perfect, it would at least act as damage limitation and would show the landlord that the tenant (me) is doing his very best to sort the situation out, but if said tenant say paid the landlord £150 per month until the HB goes live? This would ensure that the arrears would be kept as low as possible, and when the HB is live and the landlord receives the backdated HB payments, obviously the arrears owed would be considerably less than if the tenant played nothing, so with the housing benefit now up to date and running the tenant (me) continues to pay £150 per month until the arrears are paid off?.
    Does that sound reasonable? I mean I am making a major contribution to the rent cost and arrears whilst not bankrupting the tenant (me) and the landlord can rely on the fact, until the HB is being payed he will get a regular payment of £150 at least, in the meantime (I) the tenant can ring the council every day to chase up the claim and them report back to the landlord.
    In dealing with civil servants a little polite persistence can work wonders and the tenant then reports back to the landlord with any updates.
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    The harsh reality is that while there are working tenants with good credit history - thus allowing Landlords to obtain RGI (Rent G'tee Ins) - for a any given rental on the market - benefit tenants will be at back of queue - unless they have a home owning Guarantor to offer.

    Plus where LHA is paid direct there remains the risk of LHA clawback from Landlord if there proves to be an issue with Tenant's claim.

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    Right, so that means I am stuck in this goddamn awful please then?
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    The inherent risk of relocation within PRS is that whilst you have had the benefit of a 10 year rental in Devon - you could be limited to 6 to 12 months elsewhere - most likely an initial 6 month AST - though you would never be privy to the long term plans of an individual Landlord who could choose to sell up.

    What exactly are the issues with your Devon rental? What did you think of the Brighton flat I linked you to??

    I assume it is self contained and replicating that anywhere in London/SE would be challenging due to LHA shortfall.

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    Yes I understand that, a 6-12 month contract looking to go long term would be ideal as I am now looking to make a home for me and the cats now as opposed to a place to merely exist in, in the 20 years I have been here I have never felt at home here and always hated the place, so a place in London or Brighton would be a chance to make a home for us.

    It may not seem very important to you, but for me to make a home at my age is extremely important to me and as such I realise I will start with a 6-12 month contract, but if I can find a landlord that is on the same page as me, then I am happy to sign as many contracts as he/she wishes.
    But I am aware of the legal ramifications of signing a 6-12 month contract but if I am a quiet, no nonsense and respectful tenant, there shouldn't be any problems, as I have said I have been on this place since 2009 and I am still here, so I must be doing something right, is that fair to say? Once the supposed HB claim is sorted the landlord would never hear from me, so all that said and done a 6-12 month residential contract should be ongoing, in theory at least.
    I am not looking on moving again once I have found a place and I adhere to all the landlords demands within the tenancy contract, there shouldn't be a problem should there, I mean I don't disturb anyone, live quietly with any noise out side the flat (I am not into drinking and having fights and or parties)

    Being a quiet undisruptive tenant I would of thought I would be ideal personally.

    But I mean starting on a 6-12 month contract to me is fine as I believe trust can and should be forged, a tenant that can be relied on and a tenant that can be trusted with his/her property.
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    Fair comment Darius and, of course, LandyLordy is spot-on as usual.

    From what you've written, you seem like a reasonable and decent-enough person so I hope you find a happier place.

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