X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Refurbish/Develop

    Land Acquisition - A Good Investment?

    You're quite right, of course, Trevor - planners do work to ensure planning objectives are met. Sorry if I wasn't clear: I find that an open talk to them about what they want to see happen in an area they are interested in does wonders. I think this is your advice too - it's very beneficial to talk to them.
    If they receive the impression that one wants to work within their goals and objectives, I find, they will open up like flowers with hints at least of what kinds of proposals they would favour - though of course they always say, "Come to us with a proposal, and we'll give a view on it". You're quite right (put another way) - they cannot do an entrepreneur's job for them.
    I've never thought at all about what a planner's political persuasion might be: I just regard then as public servants and potential friends, by virtue of mutual respect, available for advice. Clearly, they tend to be very defensive about what they are willing to agree to: not surprising, because they are well used to people coming to them looking for all sorts of 'advantage', whether by conforming to the rule book or otherwise (and very often contrariwise).
    I've followed your posts elsewhere, Trevor, and respect very much that as a real and experienced professional you have been waging a successful campaign over many years to obtain permissions for clients that entrenched planners have dug their heels in over, or refused in ignorance. I recognise that meeting with a 'jobsworth' attitude from planners and local councillors is commonplace. Thus the appeal system is very necessary, and often well worth pursuing. You are far, far ahead professionally from anywhere I am ever likely to attain to when relating to planners. Indeed, I hope to be able to refer clients to you by and by, as your expertise seems to be virtually unique. Clearly, you can move mountains, and have proved that (rightly understood).
    I do apologise if I have I given any wrong advice. I have only been speaking about my own limited experiences of striking up good, helpful and useful working relationships with planners from time to time over the last decade or two.
    In a nutshell, I could not agree with you more - go talk to the local planners at the earliest possible stage. In theory at least, they should be neutral in relation to the profit potential of development, and the most professional of them are the most likely, in my view, to take an objective stance about any proposal, and consider it purely on planning grounds. These grounds could well include economic factors (like rural regeneration, for example), but not specific commercial considerations: otherwise, their views as planners would be prejudiced, and subject to influence from commercial elements.
    Please correct me if I am wrong,Trevor. No doubt you have experienced the good, the bad, and the ugly. It may be advisable, though, to open a separate thread on this topic, if worth pursuing, as Crystal simply wants advice on whether land is potentially a good investment.
    Brian


    Trevor Dennington said:
    It is easy to find out about future potential: go and talk to your local planning officer. " Brian I'm sorry, but I don't know where you got that advice from.
    Planning Officers, 98% of whom are raving Socialists who hate people making a PROFIT (cross yourself!) from land on "their patch" (yes, they think it is all theirs!) are not employed to advise would-be investors about the development potential of land.
    They are employed to pursue the PLANNING AUTHORITY'S objectives in their area, which are invariably very different to those of would-be investors i.e. land value speculators.
    The value of land in Ireland has increased quite significantly over 2008 prices, but the only reliable way to increase land value remains winning planning permission to develop it.
    0
    0
    Lots of good advice on this thread.
    I would say:
    Be very wary about investing in any land abroad as the whole legal and planning environment is so different to ours. Look at the problems that people have had in coastal regions of Spain, a relatively stable democratic country with not too much corruption.
    Equally, be very wary about investing in any schemes. Most are scams. Much better to buy a plot yourself.
    Buy that plot in a place that you know well. Not just the local geography/economics but the political landscape. Local authority will have a declared Development Plan but that counts for nothing if you have an obdurate individual as Chief Planning Officer. Some places are just best avoided unless you are willing to wait a long time and go through the Planning Appeals process (which is itself a bit of a lottery).
    0
    0
    Thank you very much to all of you for taking the time to give such valuable advice. There is a lot to digest and so it's something that I will have to research very carefully if I decide to go down that investment route. This site is a great resource particularly for new investors like myself - there's so much to learn!
    Crystal
    0
    0