X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Property-a-holics

    Landlord statistics

    Thanks Peter, I find these posts very interesting. One of the many things I've learned is that two thirds of landlords with BTL mortgages don't have to worry about S24, as well as those who don't have mortgages.

    0
    0

    Housing in England Overview Report, National Audit Office

    • 62% of homes in England are owner-occupied
    • 20% of homes in England are privately rented
    • 17% of homes in England are socially rented

    20% of homes in England that ‘non-decent’ in 2014, down from 35% in 2006

    71,500 number of homeless households in England in temporary accommodation at 31 March 2016

    £20.9 billion spending in England on housing benefit in 2015-16

    Since 2006, the cost of private rented accommodation has broadly followed changes in earnings across England. The opposite has been the casein London, where private rents rose by 32% and average earnings increased by 16%

    Social housing rents have increased faster than earnings since 2001-02.

    Homelessness has increased in recent years, although it has not reached the peak seen in 2003-04.

    <Broken link fixed>

    0
    0

    Shawbook Bank report on the UK BTL Market from June 2017

    Buy-to-let lending is heavily concentrated in London. The capital accounts for almost one in four BTL loans (24%), compared to 13% of loans for owner occupiers.

    27% of all dwellings in the capital are rental units

    0
    0

    English Housing Survey 2016-17

    Owner occupation rates remain unchanged for the fourth year in a row

    In 2016-17, the private rented sector accounted for 4.7 million or 20% of households. The social rented sector accounted for 3.9 million households or 17% of households. There was no change in the size of either sector between 2015-16 and 2016-17

    The energy efficiency of English homes has increased considerably in the last 20 years, but did not increase between 2015 and 2016

    While the under 35s have always been overrepresented in the private rented sector, over the last decade or so the increase in the proportion of such households in the private rented sector has been particularly pronounced. In 2006-07, 27% of those aged 25-34 lived in the private rented sector. By 2016-17 this had increased to 46%.

    Privately rented dwellings were more likely to be older with a third (35%) built before 1919

    0
    0

    From the 2018 Rugg report

    There has been an increase in the proportion of landlords defined as ‘individuals/couples’, from 73 per cent in 2006 to 89 per cent in 2010. Review Omnibus data indicate that  there are an estimated 2.3m adults in England who are private landlords in some form. Nine per cent of landlords are themselves private tenants. In addition, 1.9m individuals had been involved in letting property in some capacity in the past

    .For well over a decade, a stated goal of successive governments has been to encourage institutional investment in the PRS. Build to Rent (BTR) has flourished in the last ten years: by 2016, £15bn had been invested in the sector, with an expectation of a further £50bn by 2020. In Q1, 2018, completed units comprised one half of one per cent of the PRS.

    Households are living in their current tenancies for longer. In 2008/9, 39 per cent of households had lived in their current tenancy for less than a year; in 2015/16, this figure was 26 per cent. The proportion who had been living in their property for three to five years increased from 18 to 30 per cent over the same time period. There was a marked increase in tenancy lengths for families with dependent children.

    According to FRS data, average rents increased by slightly more than incomes between 2000/1 and 2015/16, leading to a slight decrease in affordability from 0.28 to 0.29 over that period. There is regional variation in this figure: in the northern regions, affordability increased slightly from 0.27 to 0.26; in London there was a decreased in affordability, as the ratio rose from 0.34 to 0.39.

    Excess rents are not endemic in the open market PRS, and the majority of tenants meet their rental payments without financial difficulty. Fewer than 10 per cent of tenants are in arrears with their rent.

    In 2017, there was a slight drop in the number of PRS dwellings, which was the first time the sector had contracted since 1999.

    In 2014, the Intermediary Mortgage Lenders Association estimated that 32 per cent of the properties entering the PRS market between 2007 and 2014 were financed with BTL mortgages. In 2016, an estimated one-third of property in the UK PRS was connected to a BTL mortgage.

    In 2016, it was reported that 49 per cent of PRS property was held without a mortgage.

    Extrapolation using percentages based on the Review Omnibus indicates that there are around 2,000 larger (100+ properties) landlords in England.

    The EHS 2014/15 indicated that 81 per cent of tenancies were assured shorthold tenancies (ASTs). The number of assured and regulated tenancies – which both offer stronger security of tenure – have diminished substantially, and in the same year together constituted fewer than four per cent of tenancies.


    1
    0

    don't need tick boxes on council forms, as many would ignore it or just leave it blank. What is needed is a proper registration of all rental property by law and those failing to register get hit with heavy fines, or more importunately confiscation of the properties.This  way councils can check up on properties to ensure they are fit to rent, tax man gets his tax and Government knows the proper state of the rental sector for future policy. Its not rocket science. .Next question will be what about mortgaged property- simple the government via new National Housing Association takes it over pays off the mortgage company and then is able to build up a stock of housing for social use. The government then goes after the previous owner for the balance- easy as many will have assets elsewhere or even their owner occupied properties.  With the state of the rental market and voters in this sector you would have the votes need to form an political party if not a government. As I have said before Housing is the biggest and most urgent problem facing this country , and time is running out to fix it.

    0
    1