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  • LHA/Universal Credit

    LHA/Universal Credit Seminar London

    Hi Everyone

    I'm in London next week doing an LHA/Universal Credit seminar in the IBIS, hotel Euston, starting 10 am. This is the latest in a series I've been doing in different parts of the country. I limit places to no more than 25 and there's only a handful left if you're interested.

    The programme lists all the areas to be covered. Feedback from delegates has been excellent, mainly because I focus on how the old and new schemes differ; how to optimise your tenant's best use of the scheme; and how to mitigate potential losses. you'll find the programme here: http://universalcreditadvice.com/private...me-nuances

    Anyone interested in coming along or simply wants to find out more about what I'm planning to cover can contact me bill@ucadvice.co.uk or phone me on 07733 080 389.

    Bill Irvine

    UC Advice & Advocacy Ltd

    http://www.ucadvice.co.uk

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    Is there any chance you may upload your conferences to YouTube!?

    I'm sure many LL not able to make the meetings would like to watch them

    I'm sure you would receive some business from those LL seeking your experienced advocacy in these matters.

    Your YouTube could be a valuable marketing funnel

    Many LL will I fear be needing your valuable services!?

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    Paul

    It's maybe something I'll do in the future but, for the moment, not in my plans. It's ironical, that every time I post, you're the first to respond, even though you have little or no interest from your business perspective. 

    Thankfully, there are some 1.8 million homes, currently renting to LHA tenants; more now than ever there's been. At some point, in the future, most, if not all of these tenancies, will transfer to Universal Credit or its Pension Housing Credit equivalent (still in DWP plans, although on hold). The scheme, in some ways is similar to LHA, but there are many significant differences, some of which will prove challenging and nonsensical to landlords. At the minute, many landlords and their tenants, are struggling with the new scheme's complexities, causing major rent arrears and ultimately long term rental loss. There's no doubt, in my mind, things will eventually improve, like it did with LHA in 2010/11 after 2/3 years of turmoil. Landlords who spend time familiarising themselves with the key components and especially the threats to rental collection, will be best placed to handle the stormy waters ahead of them. I can help them understand the key risks.

    Bill Irvine

    UC Advice & Advocacy Ltd

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    Indeed you are absolutely correct

    I intend NEVER to have anything to do with HB tenants.

    However I am aware that I may not always be in control of what tenants can pay

    If I struggled to source tenants who could afford my market rents or worse my existing tenants ended up on HB with no opportunity for me to replace those HB tenants with better paying ones, I would need to have some understanding of the UC process!!

    I like to think I am not complacent about these issues.

    ###t happens!!

    Which is why I pay attention to what you have to say and seek to understand how the new systems work.

    Even though I am personally not impacted currently by any HB issues!.

    You never know!!?

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    No longer a landlord but I am very tempted Bill but am in the North West and in the middle of an undergraduate dissertation due in 28 April.   The theme of which has been inspired by this forum.

    I am exploring how a myriad of government policies around housing, taxation and welfare will affect PRS and ultimately tenants in the backdrop of a housing crisis. There's other themes such as how political ideology informs policy and the discourses that serve to justify it and social exclusion.   I kind of  know how UC is panning out and where I think it will lead but LHA is my weak spot.

    I'd love to attend your seminar but not sure I can justify it price and time wise.  Your website is a mine of information though.  If I joined under the  landlord how quickly can membership be arranged. Maybe you should consider student memberships/prices to your site and events?

    Best of luck with it.

    Andrea

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    Really looking forward to reading your dissertation, if I may! Might prove useful for government too. What university are you studying at?

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    You're too kind Rachel.  It is only undergrad level so not sure it will be that influential but you are welcome to read it if I ever finish it. I must be a complete bore with it but it is taking over my  life. I have to do quite a substansive chapter on post war housing policy which I was dreading. I am only up to 1950s but finding it absolutely fascinating to review how home ownership started to become the dominant ideal and early signs of social housing decline in popularity and how the seeds of the negative view of the PRS landlords started to develop. 

    If you were a real saddo like me you could try and get hold of Housing and the Welfare State by Peter Malpass. My copy is the 5th edition. It is an academic book but so detailed it creates a glorious social history.

    For instance the tone in which the then Tory government stereotyped the people living in slum housing was quite shocking. Then the LAs were diverted away from providing homes for general need with this aspect being moved to the private sector. LAs were forced into focussing on slum clearances so this started to see mainly people from the clearance areas getting the council houses and that is when the stigmatising of certain estates actually started. We're only in the 50s here!

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    Doesn't sound boring at all, and neither do your posts.

    I now have only 3 books to clear on my bedside table, having finally finished Anna Karenina. Only took a year, although I was living on a building site for about half of that year (any excuse). I will think about adding Peter Malpass's book to the pile, but I'm still keen on your dissertation. If I stick to my current reading rate, you may have up to 3 years to finish it! Please continue to drip feed up with little snippets along the way ...


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    Ha ha no problem. Unfortunately salford uni insist it is submitted by 2nd May and due to work I will have to do it by 28 April.  Best crack on only about another 50 years to summarise into a chapter Sad

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    You will find many of the alleged slums were no such thing

    You need to check out the socialist councils of the time and their stupid politics.




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    Ha ha well I wasn't there so I have no idea. I remember a lot of derelict buildings in the 70s. We actually used to play in them. If my mother knew! I remember my great gran's being demolished. She had a scary outside loo but slum it was not.  Not in my 4 year old  mind anyway it was all chintzy and like an Alaadins cave of bric a brac including a gorgeous art deco lamp of a nude lady I would love to have in my possession  now! Maybe it was structurally unsound I have no idea. They moved into a dreadful maisonette but they were on the ground floor and I think they had struggled with the stairs before

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