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  • Buy-to-Let

    Sacrifices you made for property success?

    Ah yes the crafty nap is the key to success .

    I can do a 2 minute nod off at ad hoc times and it  powers me up for another 4 hrs

    I can tell how long I drop off for  through the pause button on Sky just before I drift

    Vital goals scored and moments in history which used to be missed are now just on a short time delay

    I cant remember when i ever did 8 hrs straight . It just never happens

    I dont suffer from insomnia but I just sleep when I`m tired and live when I`m awake

    So I think its a metabolism thing and we all have our predisposition to x number of hours sleep

    Whether one can train oneself to sleep less and still operate at optimum levels i dont know

    I`m sure a sleep scientist would help here

    But fortunately my disposition enables me to  pack maybe more into an average day than others

    Be that work rest or play

    So the traditional 8 8 8 distribution for me became at various points  12 5 7  or even 14 6 4 @ peak

    Do 14 6 4 between 20 and 25  then 12 5 7   25 to 30 then 8 8 8  30 - 40 when family and young kids

    But the hard work you do between 20 and 30 pays dividends when/ if  you can then retire at 45 to 50

    Energy levels start to tail off at 50

    50 to 100 can be  the best times

    100 to eternity are a bit boring I reckon . God may have a different view on this though

    But I`m convinced that if the art of a `power nap` can be mastered then it doubles your chances of success

    I think its the Japanese who do this well with their sleep pods in offices . It improves productivity

    A good boss would see you yawning and so maybe smartly would say  - go and take a 15 min sleep break

    Our culture is more to shout at the poor individual and say I`m not paying you to sleep on my time etc

    The employee  gets miffed and slows down anyway partly through tiredness and partly as they are now sulking

    Getting the balance right is different for different people

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    Jonathan Clarke. http://www.buytoletmk.com

    I came across this 300 year old blog that discusses some of points people have made above. Thought it was worth a share...

    Your savings, believe it or not, affect the way you stand, the way you walk, the tone of your voice. In short, your physical wellbeing and self-confidence. A man without savings is always running. He must. He must take the first job offered, or nearly so. He sits nervously on life’s chairs because any small emergency throws him into the hands of others.

    Without savings, a man must be too grateful. Gratitude is a fine thing in its place. But a constant state of gratitude is a horrible place in which to live. A man with savings can walk tall. He may appraise opportunities in a relaxed way, have time for judicious estimates and not be rushed by economic necessity. A man with savings can afford to resign from his job. If his principles so dictate.

    And for this reason he’ll never need to do so. A man who can afford to quit is much more useful to his company, and therefore more promotable. He can afford to give his company the benefits of his most candid judgements. A man always concerned about necessities, such as food and rent, can’t afford to think in long-range career terms. He must dart to the most immediate opportunity for ready cash.

    Without savings, he will spend a lifetime of darting, dodging. A man with savings can afford the wonderful privilege of being generous in family or neighbourhood emergencies. He can take a level stare into the eyes of any man… friend, stranger or enemy. It shapes his personality and character. The ability to save has nothing to do with the size of income. Many high-income people, who spend it all, are on a treadmill darting through life like minnows.

    The dean of American bankers, J.P. Morgan, once advised a young broker, ‘take waste out of your spending, you’ll drive the haste out of your life’. Will Rogers put it this way, ‘I’d rather have the company of a janitor, living on what he earned last year… than an actor spending what he’ll earn next year.’ If you don’t need money for college, a house or retirement, then save for self-confidence. The state of your savings does have a lot to do with how tall you walk.

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    We are family with two kids and we have made quite few sacrifices. Leaving with lodgers for 5 years for a start so loss of privacy when kids were small. This was hard at times. We have never spend money on branded clothes ( not that we miss this ), always driving older cars with no finanse, buying second hand stuff often. Some may call us cheap. But then we have 2 houses in E17 worth 1,2 mln with good equity, two flats in Poland and no loans apart of mortgage. Fairly decent cashflow too. Was it worth it? Yes. Would I do that again now? Rather not Smile We are still living frugal life but allowing ourselfs for more pleasures and good holidays Smile

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    Kureski - you have given a lot for your dream. Enjoy it!

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    What is it with having to change kitchens and bathrooms in your own residential every few years? Some of these kitchens are 15k a pop which is nearly enough for a deposit in some areas .It’s a definite Venus and Mars thing as I’ve never come across a case where it’s been the man rather than the woman who has pushed for it. 
        Another big waste of money is shiny new cars which depreciate by thousands every year . There is no way any of these modern cars drive better or are more comfortable than my big 12 year old Volvo S60 which has a trade in value of about 1.5k and has at least another 5 years left in it .
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    100% agree .

    Its the TV in the corner that quietly seduces weak people to spend

    My mums 3 piece suite is 50 years old .

    Perfectly ok with a few cushions to prop you up

    Both my cars about 3K combined value

    The dashboard lights up with various faults every other day

    My fave is the big letters flashing  STOP STOP STOP when the leaking rad runs dry

    Another gallon of water to top it up and it runs for another month no sweat

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    Jonathan Clarke. http://www.buytoletmk.com

    If you are getting that many warning lights you can’t have a Volvo it must be a Citroen ! Actually in old cars like ours a lot of these warning lights are just the sensors being old and failing rather than a failure of the part they are referring to . I investigate any  to do with brakes though have for obvious safety reasons but also because they fail MOTs now if any brake sensor lights are on even if they seem to be working fine . 
           I love parking mine up anywhere I like including leaving it overnight after a night out and not being in the slightest bit bothered about it being scratched or it being nicked . The neighbours whinge and think I’m bringing the area down though as they all have shiny BMWs and Mercs .
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    A car worth 1.5k. Sheer luxury ! I asked about the trade in value of my 2002 Ford Focus (skip on wheels), and the bloke said "£10 a foot".
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    You have overvalued your car then! It’s fair value is £50.
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