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  • Refurbish/Develop

    Happy to Help with your Design

    Here are Sarah's top tips on small things you can do to improve your chances of selling - none of these will cost you much, hope these help:
    1) Be realistic on price
    As a general rule everything has a price - the chances are if you have not had any viewers or had viewers but no offers, it's probably on for too much money. If you really want to sell you need to drop the price, but not by a tiny bit. I would advise in a falling market you get below the market - you are far better off with several buyers all banging the door down to buy, than with no interest at all. At least then you have a decision to make as to whether you actually sell for that amount or not. Currently, I believe we are bumping along the bottom, so now is certainly not the time to overprice if you want a sale.
    The two ways to value are to find out how much a home like yours recently sold for and/or look at what you can buy at the level you think you should be selling for - ie if you think your 2 bedroom flat should be worth £130,000 but there are lots of 3 bedroom houses at a similar level - you are unlikely to achieve your price.
    2) Clean the whole house
    If you smoke, stop smoking inside and clean all ashtrays - if you have pets, wash their beds. Pet and cigarette odour are the two smells that come up most often in ‘put off' smells list. Look at your kitchen and bathroom from an outsider's point of view - if they are really manky do something about it - often it only requires bleaching the grout and cutting out and re siliconing - get in behind the basin and loo and get scrubbing there, too . Deal with outside - start on the street - what do you see - potential viewers will stand and pause just there too and it's their first impression. Don't argue with neighbours about who is going to do what - check if they don't mind and get on and clean it up yourself. Outside space is a real luxury and one that should be cherished, especially in an urban setting. Give it a clean - get a few cheapie pot plants and look out for an inexpensive table and chairs to show you can use the space.
    3) De-clutter
    As if you haven’t heard it before, but use this as the perfect moment to move the piles of stuff you don't use to a charity shop - if you do a good clear out in one go you will be better about getting what you don't need to a suitable recycling unit or charity shop where someone might actually use your silly unwanted nonsense. You are then able to clear surfaces - this will give a much greater sense of space and almost more importantly, less of the feeling that the house is rather hard work to live in, in a tidy way. Like small gardens, it's rather more important to dress small rooms well, otherwise people may not be able to really envisage how the room could work. Try to avoid putting things just inside the door of a room - you ideally want to be able to get inside a room before you trip over something.
    4) Don’t wait to get your house on the market
    Traditionally there are busier and quieter times of the year for house selling. These are based on what much of the population is doing. December is quieter as everyone builds up to Christmas but the market tends to pick up in the new year - equally August tends to be quiet. However in these more uncertain times, I personally recommend that you don't wait, as despite what you endlessly read, the truth is nobody has any idea what is actually going to happen in the market. If now is the right time in your life to sell, get on with it asap. If the market falls lower by the ‘suitable time economically' you will kick yourself. Equally, if now is a good time in your life to sell, sell now, as you never know, the market may have moved down if you wait.
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    Here I go again......rebuilding my main home (after a fire - yes, candles apparently). I'm using bamboo flooring instead of standard oak or pine tongue and groove planks. Bamboo is a) eco/greenish b) 20% harder wearing than hardwood floors. The downside are 'floods and leaks' - it can curl faster than normal wood floors. In my case, all new plumbing so not worried on that front. It is also about 50% cheaper and 20% better wear. The next feature I am bringing in, which the builders melted over......is TADELAKT - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wvf2UGMnjuE Copy and paste the link and see how it's done - there are better videos out there. Tadelakt is a bright, nearly waterproof lime plaster which can be used on the inside of buildings and on the outside. It is the traditional coating of the palaces, hammams and bathrooms of the riads in Morocco. Its traditional application includes being polished with a river stone and treated with a soft soap to acquire its final appearance and water resistance. Tadelakt has a luxurious, soft aspect with undulations due to the work of the artisans who finish it; in certain installations, it is suitable for making bathtubs, showers, and washbasins and confers great decorative capacities. Traditionally, tadelakt is produced with the lime of the area of Marrakech. I am also using exterior photographs on walls and fences (small wee postage stamp gardens, passages, benefit most from this treatment) For example - instead of staring at your neighbours brick wall - 3feet away, ask if you can hang exterior wall art or have a favorite holiday snap landscape facing you. (obviously, ask neighbour). There is a huge range of exterior wall art available ............https://www.insideout-gardenart.co.uk/ Also, if you rent furnished and live near London, I can get you a trade card for wholesalers of decorative bits. happy shopping
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    Gail,
    Good to hear from you and to hear about your project.
    Maybe the rebuild after the fire deserves its own thread plus pictures.
    John Corey
    Follow me on Twitter-> https://www.twitter.com/john_corey
    https://www.ChelseaPrivateEquity.com/blog
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    John Corey 


    I host the London Real Estate Meet on the 2nd Tuesday of every month since 2005. If you have never been before, email me for the 'new visitor' link.

    PropertyFortress.com/Events

    Also happy to chat on the phone. Pay It Forward; my way of giving back through sharing. Click on the link: PropertyFortress.com/Ask-John to book a time. I will call you at the time you selected. Nothing to buy. Just be prepared with your questions so we can use the 20 minutes wisely.

    Hi John. I keep saying this is my last project and then I go and buy another one as well. I must not be 'finished' ! in more ways than one. I hear many of the reno's in london are using Tadelakt tradesman but....it is easy enough to do yourself. Just received a quote for two bathrooms and small kitchen wall - £3200+. I have done this myself in france and it is fab. You can make it rough or as smooth and reflective as glass. It looks like polished marble when finished. My friend simply continued his bathroom wall into the bathtub and curved the whole thing, put in alcoves and his own personal pissoir ! all out of the lime morter - very versatile. It may become a 'trend' but for me it's just evolution. I doubt I shall be taking photos but you never know.
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