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  • Refurbish/Develop

    Brick skin on non standard construction

    Hi all. I'm on the process of purchasing a bungalow to convert into an HMO. It is currently  wooden frame with a normal tiled roof. Plenty of room in the roof overhang to put in an outer brick skin to make it mortgageable. Anyone done this before and have any tips or things to look out for. Obvious ones for me are wood rot or infestation. All the numbers stack up so I'm not worried about that, although an idea of cost would be good to know.

    Thanks in advance.

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    why not use acro's to prop up the joists for the supporting wall and strongboys on the wall plate for the other ends and rebuild the walls in 9 inch partywalls

    just as easy to do cant see an issue re foundations on a bungalow

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    Chartered Accountant, FCA 34th year in public practice,

    BTL since 1992

    http://www.blythepropertyholdings.com

    Thanks I'll suggest that.  However building control talked about having a cavity. Also tne lical council may not permit blocks and rendering as I need to blend in with neighbours  brickwork.

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    a picture of when a car drove into our building and rocked a 15m wall of its foundations at the dpm and moved a couple of steels

    the whole 15 metre wall was removed and rebuilt whilst the office continued at the other side of the building

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    Chartered Accountant, FCA 34th year in public practice,

    BTL since 1992

    http://www.blythepropertyholdings.com

    I doubt it will make it mortgageable unless it gets building reg approval.

    may also need planning permission as you are making footprint bigger.

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    Already been in contact with both planning and building control as of course it has to be done correctly. Every mortgage advisor I've spoken to says it will be mortgagable. Thanks

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    Most modern built houses are timber framed with brick or block outer skin. Providing there is an air gap and correct drainage and ventilation it should not be a problem.

    planning and building regs are a must, or future resale will be impossible.

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    Major problem is if and when you want to sale , many people would be put off so don't expect any capital appreciation.

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    I have spoken to local agents who state once it's up to spec won't be a problem selling at normal prices. As already mentioned its how they are built now anyway.

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    A few loosely formed thoughts:

    • Have you confirmed there is enough existing footing to build the new brick off? Or will you  need to extend / add new foundation?
    • The masonry will need to be tied back to the timber frame (specific ties exist for this). If current sheathing (cladding) is thin/doesn't hold a fixing well, you'll want to make sure the tie s are fixed into the timber studs.  Pay special attention to mortar dropping into the cavity, collecting at the bottom and creating a bridge for moisture to track across back to timber frame.  Build up of mortar droppings'on wall ties create same problems.
    • Building Control might classify the work as major renovation of an element and demand that you upgrade wall thermal insulation, which could either increase your cavity size (increasing risk of missing slab/footing) or require stripping off plasterboard to install insulation from inside.  Will wall depth accommodate the required insulation thickness?  
    • Window reveal detail might be tricky to make look good and weather tight.
    • The need for vapour barriers and breather membrane should be considered if Building Regs Part C is to be met.  The diagram below is an extract from Part C, Diagram 11 showing the conventional arrangement for a stud wall/masonry veneer to satisfy Building Regs:


    • Depending on the sole plate/ground level/floor level arrangements, it might need careful detailing to make sure you direct any moisture that does get into the cavity away from timber. Note the requirement for a vented and drained cavity.  Min. 50mm cavity from memory, don't quote me on that though.
    • Whilst intuition suggests you are protecting the timber frame from rain, the new masonry covering has the potential to enclose the timber frame in a damp environment and increase the risk of rot if not detailed correctly.
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    http://www.smartbuild.uk.com | Structural Engineer

    Thanks for this. We have budgeted for digging new footing, which I think will definately need doing.  The outer cladding is currently rock solid 1inch thick timber. We are liaising with building control and will meet their requirements. We always insulate as much as we can anyway.


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