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  • Buy-to-Let

    Campaign to encourage landlords to allow cats


    We do hope that Property Tribes' members will support this campaign and reconsider if you previously had a "no cats" policy.

    For more information, please visit the Cats Protection website. 

    SEE ALSO  -          As a landlord do you allow pets?

    UP NEXT -              "Purrfect Landlords" let to tenants with cats

    DON'T MISS -          Pet Deposits and amount?

    NOW WATCH:

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    This is really uplifting to hear! It is important nowadays that tenancy agreements as you said reflect modern day living, and take into consideration people with pets. Especially as the amount of people renting each year is increasing, it is good to see this initiative taking place.

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    To put an opposing viewpoint, the general cat rule  for me is no unless I am REALLY convinced.

    The last tenant I had with a cat left the patio doors ajar 24-7 to allow the damn thing in and out whenever it wanted. Once bitten etc.

    Dogs I do; I can assess a dog and predict if it , and they require regular attendance. Nearly half of my tenants have or have had dogs, up to a quantity of nine. People think cats can be left alone.

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    Allowing pets is all very well, and cats don’t bark, but any landlord that has had to deal with fleas will have a very different view. I’ve had 3 infestations all as a result of tenants breaching the tenancy and bringing cats into the property without asking permission. The last lot cost £500 to get rid of, fortunately in each case the infestation had not spread to other flats, but the common areas were treated just as a precaution.

    To ensure the problem has been dealt with  means leaving a property empty for a month, with several visits to hoover and disturb any un hatched  eggs. For me personally flats are not the place for pets and i’ve yet to find a tenant that wants to put up an additional deposit for dealing with pet related issues.

    The touchy feely “isn’t fluffykins adorable” approach is all well and good , but in reality it can all be an unneeded nuisance.

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    If you watched the video, we discussed that the tenant should be able to provide a "passport" of visits to the vet and the landlord could stipulate that the cat has to have a regular flea treatment.

    I am quite happy to concede that I am writing from the perspective of someone who adores my cats and could not live without them, so in this instance, I freely admit that I am in agreement with tenants who feel the same.   

    Landlords and tenants share a lot of common ground and its good to build on that where ever it occurs.

    I feel extremely sorry for people who have had to let their cat go because they can't find a landlord who will accept it.  That would certainly devastate me.  It might be "touchy feely" but private landlords can offer such a service if they choose, and it creates good relations with tenants and gives a better public image of landlords, something that is much needed at this moment in time imho.

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    I appreciate thet there are many who look after their pets properly, however in my experience too many do not. I have a no pet clause in my tenancy agreements ,but have found that tenants move straight in with pets , knowing their is little i can do about it, i’ve been advised that it’s unlikely i’d be granted a possession on the grounds of a tenancy breach of this nature.

    As for the comment about their being no need for a “deep clean” fee because after 5 years a property would be needing redecoration anyway, many of us don’t have rents high enough to cover such costs, and is it really too much to ask for a percentage contribution towards carpets/underlay ruined by dog/cat fouling?

    Every landlord is as you point out entitled to have their own policy/view. Mine are based on experiences where dogs are left unattended and bark continuosly and foul carpets, with cats its fleas and smelly litter trays. In all cases its a result of irresponsible ownership. 

    There have been several articles over the last year or so bringing the issue of pet clauses in private tenancies to the fore, to me this is just the latest. Such camapigns are fine but they need a bit of balance.

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    Yes I watched the vid.

    I think the lady could have noted more strongly that blanket "no pets" clauses have long been questionable in law, and that "deep clean" requirements should perhaps have a time limit of say 5 years - LLs will be redecorating then anyway so little extra cost should attach.

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    In a new study of the priorities of young people,  29% claimed they wanted to buy a pet before having children!

    Source/full article

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    I have found that most tenants who want a cat do not ask anyway and these are the ones that have pets that in many instances do serious damage to carpets trying to get through closed doors and if they don't get out just urinate indoors instead.

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