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  • Hello,

    Has anyone or would anyone purchase a property with dry rot. To the extreme that the access will only be available to the ground floor of the property ?

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    No reason why not as long as the purchase price reflects at least the cost of the rectification. You are almost certain to encounter unexpected work once repairs commence, hence an allowance needs to be made for that in any purchase offer.

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    The problem with dry rot is that it can and does creep to other areas, without showing any signs until exposed.

    I had it in bottom left corner of a downstairs kitchen after removing rotten units etc I found tendrils running under the perfect looking plaster, leading to floor joists in top right corner the were rotten but r the area nearest the initial out break was fine. Timber replaced, treated, replaster, treated,  new units, treated, then treated again. No problems since apart from the cost.

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    Thankyou. I have heard it creeps into other areas thats what is putting me off.

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    For timber rots to occur there needs to be more moisture present than there should be.  Identify the source of excess moisture, correct it, let things dry out (this may take a long time) and the rot will cease.   

    'access will only be available to the ground floor'

    Does this mean it's the upper floor joists that are rotten?   It's more often the ground floor joists that are affected (rising damp in walls, poorly ventilated sub floor voids etc.) so I would want to fully understand why it's occurred up at that level and what needs to be done to reduce moisture levels to ensure any replacement timber you install doesn't go the same way.

    This video gives some good info on timber rot and remedial approach: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjVceFYuNdo

     

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    http://www.smartbuild.uk.com | Structural Engineer

    Thats great. Thankyou. Im not sure if it is the upstsairs joists. Ive been told theres a strong chance it can come back in different areas which if true has put me off purchasing.

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    It will only come back if the damp hasn't been sorted.  If the timber remains below 20% moisture content it won't rot.  Timber in correctly functioning house shouldn't be above 15%. 

    Dry rot chemical treatment should be seen as an interim measure once the moisture source has been remedied, with it's purpose being to stop timber from rotting whilst the building dries out, as this can take a long time.

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    http://www.smartbuild.uk.com | Structural Engineer

    I had dry rot through three floors of a house, and it is a bit messy. In my case  both the wood and brick work had to be treated. Also I am not sure but I think you have to treat as least 1 meter way from last sign of the affected area. You never know the full extent of the problem until you start to uncover it.

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