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  • Refurbish/Develop

    Future-proofing kitchen tiles?

    Hello all

    I had a property refurbed back in 2017. This is my first and only rental property. It's had the same tenants since it first went onto the rental market, and they've taken good care of the property.

    However, due to some dodgy roofing work, there have been a number of leaks, so I'm at a stage where painting maintenance needs to be done. As an addition to this, the kitchen was never tiled behind the cooker, which is ridiculous as the walls are just painted and are constantly having to be cleaned.

    The tenants have offered to fit their own glass splashback, but I thought it would be better to fork out to get it tiled.

    Sorry for the ramble, but the the crux of my question is, for future-maintenance requirements is it best to just go for plain white tiles?

    I would do this, but I don't think they would work too well in the kitchen, in fact I think they'd stand out like a sore thumb and ruin the overall look of it. I've suggested to the Estate Agent that if the tenants want to be involved in the decision re tiles, I'm happy to take a look at any they think might work there - I don't intend to spend a ridiculous amount, but I think it would be nice for them to have some input given they've had to put up with leaks and constant upheaval while they have been repaired (including a complete new roof on the extension while they were living there).

    What do you all do re tiling for kitchens? Do you keep it simple and plain?

    I was thinking of ordering over so that if there are any mishaps, they can be replaced, which should future-proof it until the tiles are discontinued, which happens with all tiles at some point.

    Any suggestions would be most welcome.

    Thanks

    Carol

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    I haven't used tiles in my kitchen for years. The tiles are easy enough to keep clean but the grout is a different matter. I've fitted my kitchens and a few for others with splashbacks, they're much easier to keep clean.

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    A good teacher must know the rules; a good pupil, the exceptions.

    Martin H. Fischer

    Hi Carol,

    I think if you purchase some extra tiles, you will be covered in the future.

    Up-grades to rental properties help them stand out from the neutral crowd and I believe they are an investment that will pay returns in the long run.

    HMO case study - branded HMO with Luxome talks about higher standards of kitchen and bathroom finish to achieve maximum tenant appeal and rent. 

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    I was planning on doing that anyway (I now work in the building trade, making O&M manuals, so the necessity to keep track of what goes into a building and obtaining 'extra over' is always a good plan - also, I've fallen foul of that in my own house when a tile broke in my bathroom that can't be replaced because they're now discontinued. ENTIRE bathroom is tiled, and I don't have a solution that doesn't involve ripping the lot out and starting again - expensive error!).

    Thanks also for the advice re making it more 'upmarket'. I'm not sure right now is a good time due to all the Brexit uncertainty, but I'll bear it in mind for the future. I think I may go with the splashback option as an interim and plan to tile the whole wall in the next year or so, depending on how the property market hangs together.

    Carol

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    if the tenants want to be involved in the decision re tiles, I'm happy to take a look at any they think might work there - I don't intend to spend a ridiculous amount, but I think it would be nice for them to have some input...

    BAD IDEA IN MY OPINION.  IF THEY PICK SOMETHING NO GOOD THEY WILL BE OFFENDED.  ITS YOUR HOUSE AND YOU NEED TO CHOOSE.  PLAIN WHITE SQUARE TILES ARE A BIT BASIC.  FOR THE AMOUNT OF TILES IT WOULD BE TOO PENNY PINCHING AND FALSE ECONOMY IMO. 

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    Thanks, this is exactly the sensible reply I needed. :-) I think I have a tendency to be too nice with the tenants, but that's because they're taking good care of the place. Possibly foolish long-term...

    Carol

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    thanks.  its easy to go soft with good tenants and thats when it all goes wrong.  keep it professional.  if you keep saying yes to everything they will be upset when you eventually say no.  

    and dont forget to do a yearly rent review, even if its for a small amount extra.

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    I recently said no to them having a dog. No ill effects so far! :-)

    Carol

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    Sorry I disagree. You should involve them, but give them 3 choice all of which you are happy with. Win-win

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    They came back saying they felt a splashback would be better. As that's the cheaper option all round, and one that will be the least maintenance going forward, I'm going with that.

    Carol

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    Building relationships with tenants is good long term.

    Agree not wise to get tenant free range, but if you restrict it to maybe 5 different tiles then the tenant feels special as they have selected their own tiles and might stay longer and look better after the place

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