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  • Refurbish/Develop

    Gas pipe in concrete

    Just had a new boiler fitted that needed a new gas feed which runs against the front of the house, including under the front door. Its clipped to the wall but the plumber recommends boxing it in near the door so it doesn't get kicked etc. I understand that if you lay central heating hot water pipes in concrete you should sleeve them to leave a bit of an expansion gap and stop them rubbing against the concrete as they heat/ cool. Do gas pipes need to be wrapped - I am hoping to make a concrete step to bury the pipe safely out of harms way.

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    Try “Tallon” plastic boxing. It fixes to the pipe clips, is white plastic and should last for ever

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    Have a look at https://copperplumbing.org.uk/sites/defau...ting_0.pdf

    I think you will need to run the pipe in sleeving with a flexible fireproof seal at at least one end. The sleeving should be built into the concrete. You are going to need to cut/join the pipe to put the sleeving round it (or rather your gas safe engineer is going to need to cut/join the pipe).

    Why didn't you ask the plumber (who I assume was a gas safe engineer) this question?

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    concrete attacks copper so that is the true reason embedded pipes must be sleeved or wrapped.

    I would leave a gap between the step and the pipe so its protected but not embedded.

    talon pvc boxing also good idea as Gary suggested although not sure if ok externally.  however this is only compatible with talon clips.

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    Standard concrete does not attack copper pipe. Concrete high in sulphur and chlorides may attack the copper.

    The reason you sleeve copper pipe is to allow for thermal expansion.

    https://www.copper.org/applications/plumb...ncrete.pdf

    https://www.copper.org/applications/plumb...laster.pdf

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    your links are to docs. dated 1970 and 1965.  back then pipes were often embedded in concrete and it is not uncommon now for property owners and their insurance companies to pay the price in sorting out resulting water damage.  only a fool would not wrap or isolate copper pipes as who  can be sure what aggressive impurities are contained not only within the cement but also and especially the fines, aggregates, additives and contaminants!

    sleeving is not for thermal movement; provision for movement is only needed where copper pipes enter/ exit the concrete the embedded concrete surround as this is the weak point where stresses will be concentrated.  the thermal movement provision is not achieved by sleeving but a transverse section of pipe.

    the last time we disagreed you also were talking nonsense.

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    Internal gas pipes are usually copper and are therefore wrapped if going in concrete because (as said above) the concrete corrodes the copper, so you don't want concrete coming into contact with copper (same for water pipes).  However, external gas mains are usually a type of plastic therefore no wrapping necessary.  I've had several gas mains put in over the years and the pipes have always been plastic and never wrapped.  It is a good idea to  box in the external plastic pipe that runs up the wall to stop it getting knocked.

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    If you are using MDPE pipe above ground, you will need to get one that is treated to survive exposure to UV or sheath it in something that will protect the pipe from UV, otherwise you will need to change the pipe regularly (probably annually). See page 24 of https://www.gpsuk.com/uploads/docs/1636.pdf. With external gas meters, the MDPE pipe is geneally protected from UV where it leaves the ground by poly carbonate pipe.

    Any plastic pipe inside the building (i.e. as soon as it enters the wall) needs to be sheathed in metal. Plastic pipe can not exit the building, only enter it. See regulation 5(2)b of the GS(IaU)R 1988 https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/...ion/5/made


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    Yes - forgot to mention.  The plastic pipe above ground is sheathed by what they call a 'hockey stick' due to the shape  - but it's still better to box this against knocks.

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