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  • Legal FAQs

    Home Address On AST Tenancy Form

    Do you have to put your own home address on the AST tenancy form. Reason why Im reluctant is because the property Im looking to rent out is a block away from where I live. I dont want my new tenant popping round all the time. Ideas?

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    Assuming you are in England you need to put a suitable address for service of any legal documents, and this also has to be in UK. An agent's address is OK and you can be registered c/o the agent.

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    Andrew McCausland

    Managing Director Hamilton Square Estates Ltd

    Proprietor Wirral Property Group

    Sourcing and renovating investment property since 1994

    Hi Andrew,

    I dont have an agent, I manage my empire myself. Options?


    Steve

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    A PO box?  I do agree with David Smith, though.

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    Andrew McCausland

    Managing Director Hamilton Square Estates Ltd

    Proprietor Wirral Property Group

    Sourcing and renovating investment property since 1994

    Actually the address for service has to be in England or Wales, not merely the UK. But it does not have to be your home address. A "care of .." is fine.

    However, a tenant has a statutory right to ask for your actual address anyway and can get it from the Land Registry (assuming you have registered your property properly) so I am not sure that it is really worth the effort to hide it.

    From my experience tenants don't tend to "pop round". If anyone is guilty of that its landlords!

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    David Smith
    Landlord & Tenant Solicitor
    Anthony Gold Solicitors

    Find me on LinkedIn: uk.linkedin.com/in/dsnsmith

    All opinions are my own and do not reflect those of my firm. No comment made should be taken as legal advice and you should consult a solicitor or other legal professional for advice on your specific situation.

    I don't find that tenants pop round either, but they do text at ridiculous hours of the day ie. 5am and 11pm and expect an answer, studiously ignore them and they will soon get the message.

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    I'm fully managed and my agents don't even have my home address, just my office address, email and mobile number. That's all they need and it works fine - most of the time. Last year, I briefly had a tenant (she left after a month or two), and the story was her husband was coming to join her from overseas. Out of the blue, the tenant contacted me by email and mobile, wanting assistance from me by writing letters and signing forms etc. to assist her husband obtaining home office permission to come to the UK, i.e. immigration stuff. I was furious because I had recently got a new mobile number, and, having been bombarded by nuisance calls on my old one, was very selective about whom I give my new number to. So I was immediately on the blower to the agents. They told me it was a legal requirement for them to give my contact details to tenants, with or without my permission. Not sure if this is true, but again it's an indication of legal/nonsense: when the boot's on the other foot, they are not allowed to give a tenant's mobile number without permission from the tenant first. They did say that this tenant had made a nuisance of herself at their office, expecting them to fill in forms and suchlike for the immigration authority, which of course they were not prepared to do. They then sent her an email expressly forbidding her to contact me, as the landlord, directly.

    It annoys me that legislation is not properly thought through and rushed through parliament and the courts. A typical example is data protection - many organisations now use it as an excuse to stonewall you and not even answer a simple question: "oooh, I'm not allowed to say owing to the Data Protection Act".

    At the end of the day, we all need some privacy and private life.

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    Re: your phone, get yourself the Truecaller app, and there's a BT Callguard version as well. The BT version screens calls and both allow you to block numbers, never to bother you again.

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