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  • Buy-to-Let

    Hypothetical question

    Hypothetically if the "austerity measures" implemented by George Osbourn were to be reversed or revised, would the landlord/tenant relationship be renewed?
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    Hypothetically speaking I have no idea what a politician would do. If it gets them votes possibly.

    The UK has too much leverage in property to be able to change this much. Landlord is still in control. I don’t see it ever moving to the model in the rest of the EU.
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    Chartered Accountant, Tax Advisor and Mortgage broker

    (and BTL portfolio owner)

    stuart@johnsonsca.com

    02039077022

    Of course not. I was generalising. Generalising the EU is more tenant friendly than the UK.

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    Chartered Accountant, Tax Advisor and Mortgage broker

    (and BTL portfolio owner)

    stuart@johnsonsca.com

    02039077022

    This coincides with my view. In eastern europe privatisation of the private rental sector is still a growing force and pushes strong landlord bias laws but in established markets (France, Germany, Italy) the position is more tenant friendly. My general view is a tendency towards longer tenancies tends to favour the tenant as it is the landlord who cannot react to market changes.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43075176

    https://thenegotiator.co.uk/rental-markets-in-europe/

    The below has an interesting section on the history of residential tenancies in Europe and also shows that EU laws can/will/do force a degree of harmonisation (although I have not seen any evidence of that). [and before you quote me, I have not read it all - its very very long and academic!]

    https://www.eui.eu/Documents/Departments...Report.pdf



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    Chartered Accountant, Tax Advisor and Mortgage broker

    (and BTL portfolio owner)

    stuart@johnsonsca.com

    02039077022

    The austerity measures didn't affect my relationships with my tenants - why should it?

    Did you mean to ask 'If LHA rates were increased are you more likely to take HB/UC tenants?'?

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    No I didn't mean that at all, I am a tenant not a landlord trying to find a place in London for a man on LHA/HB with pets and generally get a negative response if at all, and I would like to know with the whole Brexit mess, if would be tenants on benefits will start getting a break, in the rental market as someone who has been searching for a place in London for a number of years. I understand why people on benefits are not preferred tenant choices, length of time for claims to go live etc, but there are people who would genuinely benefit from a little help, is there a way to get any help with this troubling precident
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    Sadly Darius - the reason that benefit tenants "need a break" is that the benefit system has become so dysfunctional that it serves neither claimant nor landlord.

    Back in the 1980s Tory Govt famously said "let HB take the strain" - which indeed it did until April 2008 - prior to which HB was in practice largely unlimited (within allowed bedroom number for each claimant household).

    From April 2008 LHA put half of all private lets off limits overnight for new claimants - and as we know that was further reduced in 2012 to cheapest 30% of local market lettings - and since then disconnected from further direct reference to actual rents - so that today in most of UK there is a 20/25% shortfall of LHA for self contained rentals.

    As a result even Shelter (typically anti-landlord) are now calling for an LHA increase.

    One can not help but conclude that Govt make the benefit system deliberately dysfunctional so as to discourage people from either claiming at all - or from continuing as a claimant if there is any possible alternative abailable. Even then genuine eligible claimants are routinely sanctioned for the most trivial excuses eg being 5 mins late for Job Centre interview when say bus is late etc.


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    Yes I am aware of the Draconian way both landlords and tenants are treated, does it not breach human rights or something, that aside, who do we talk to about this? As personally it would greatly benefit my health to seek the treatment I need in a place like London, so does anyone know who in the government we or I should apply a little pressure too, as where I am is making me ill and I feel some toffee nosed twat in London needs a rocket inserted into various bodily holes.
    This exclusion is damaging a lot of people's health and harming both the social and family demographic in society.
    Who do we make our case too?
    Is there a landlord in London that is willing to accept a tenant on HB/LHA anymore? I thought the zero deposit scheme was a step in the right direction, but I have seen very little benefit from such a scheme.

    Who is out there looking out for us? Both landlords and tenants alike Or are we just casualties in George Osborne's austerity manifesto.

    Would a petition help?
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    Some 1.5 million UK landlords do have LHA tenants - and London will have a big portion of those.

    At this juncture Brexit is the only game in town for existing Govt - and there could well be a change of Govt within months - so not best time for petitions etc.

    The Guardian had a recent article flagging that some 24,000 households had been forced to relocate many miles away from London/SE due to LHA  - and many of those would be households with dependent children.

    Since 2013 law change Councils have been allowed to bounce "accepted homeless" cases in to PRS where of course the LHA cap is a major hurdle.

    OBC was cut in Nov 2016 by £3000 pa in London and by £6000 pa elsewhere - so overall moving from West Country to London is very much swimming against the tide for any low income household - and many London Boroughs have applied a gate keeping policy for social housing whereby 5 or even 10 years residency in the Borough is needed.


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