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  • Tenant Referencing

    Landlord referencing co uk-the fight against rotten tenants

    This website just started in Somerset and it's absolutely brilliant.They send me details of rotten tenants who are looking for properties in the area and have just ripped off their landlord.

     

    It sends me warnings and I'm about to blacklist all my rotten ex tenants.Ive got 2 current tenants that I'm going to blacklist as soon as the baliffs arrive.

     

    North Somerset Council are going to find it much harder to house people once this site is established.There will be greater demand for bed and breakfast because thats the only accommodation they will find.

     

    It will also serve as a deterrent not to rip off your landlord.

     

    You can find it at http://www.landlordreferencing.co.uk

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    What a fabulous idea - I hope it spreads nationally!! Doug
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    Bill,
    At risk of getting shot down in flames, I think that you have assumed to much about what these people do.
    The website doesn't actually mention "rotten tenants" or "blacklisting" certainly not on the landing page anyway.
    Quote...
    Landlord Referencing Service (LRS) enables you to reference prospective tenants directly with their last landlord. LRS is unique from all other referencing services as it is not about referencing against the information that a prospective tenant gives you, it is about referencing against the information they don't give you that makes LRS unique. No prospective tenant would give you their last landlord as a reference if they trashed your property and left without paying their rent!
    I would be concerned about leaving negative feedback about present or former tenants, two pieces of legislation spring to mind, maybe Tessa could enlighten us further?
    1. The Data Protection Act 1998 - The link to the "rules" can be found here
    2.The Human Rights Act 1998 - Link here
    You can give a bad reference but the person giving the reference will have to be very sure of their facts and be very objective in what you say.
    Personally, for legal reasons, I wouldnt give a bad reference but would just refuse to give a reference in a situation where imho there were 'difficult' circumstances and let the potential new landlord/tenant read between the lines.
    It is for this reason that personally, I always pursue non-paying tenants through the legal system as therefore, in the eyes of the law I have established fact that the tenent hasn't paid rather than relying on subjective opinion.
    It will however be interesting to see how this system develops and look forward to future updates and comments from others.
    Rob
    Sourcing genuine property deals in Wakefield and the Five Towns
    Follow me on Twitter @walkerfox
    Read my blog https://walkerfox.wordpress.com/
    Skype: walkerfox
    Email: rob@walkerfox.co.uk
    07960 753550
    Yorkshire Property Tribe Next Meeting https://tiny.cc/e4gv8
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    Here is the comment I posted on the actual site offering the service yesterday:
    There are a number of methods available to landlords seeking references for their tenants such as credit agencies, employers, family and friends but none of these will say how a tenant conducts himself, for example whether he pays his rent on time and the kind of lifestyle he has.
    Therefore this sytem operates on what the tenant doesn't say with the site stating that 'the previous landlord can give a one hundred percent unbiased and informative opinion as they have one to one experience in dealing with the tenant first hand'.
    What interests me the most about this service however is the fact that ARLA tried to create a central database of information on landlord/tenant behaviour, rent arrears, condition of property, etc to be shared between private landlords and managing agents. However, this was considered to be an intrusion into the privacy of both landlords and tenants. The Information Commissioners office said that the creation of such a system should be a necessary and proportionate response to a problem that is sufficient to warrant the creation of such an intrusive system.
    I obviously don't condone the actions of tenants that do nothing but trash places and deliberately fall into arrears because paying the rent is somewhere near the bottom of their priorities.
    But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?
    Miss Sharon Crossland AIRPM
    Leasehold Life
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    Susanne,
    DP is a huge obligation, privacy does not constitute freedom from obligation when dealing with other peoples personal data.
    From a prominent case in the construction industry relating to a "private" database of "problematic" construction workers who the major players were frequently referring to and making employment related decisions on the data held. Read the full article here
    I think that the Information Commissioner may show an interest in this site quite soon too.
    Leading construction firms were named and shamed by an official watchdog for unlawfully blacklisting trade union activists.
    Construction group Balfour Beatty was prominent on the list of 14 companies published today by the information commissioner, Christopher Graham. The commissioner found that the construction industry had been funding a clandestine blacklisting operation for at least 15 years. He believes workers may have been unfairly denied work as a result of the blacklist.
    "Sensitive" personal details of more than 3,200 workers were kept on a secret "intelligence" database. The files recorded individuals' trade union activities and employment conduct, with warnings that they could cause trouble. Comments included "Do not touch", "Communist party", "ex-shop steward, definite problems, no go".
    Graham ruled that the firms had broken data privacy laws and ordered them to stop using details from the database or gathering covert information.
    A 66-year-old private investigator, Ian Kerr, was fined £5,000 last month for his role in administering the database. He has since stopped running it.
    Rob
    Sourcing genuine property deals in Wakefield and the Five Towns
    Follow me on Twitter @walkerfox
    Read my blog https://walkerfox.wordpress.com/
    Skype: walkerfox
    Email: rob@walkerfox.co.uk
    07960 753550
    Yorkshire Property Tribe Next Meeting https://tiny.cc/e4gv8
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    Landlord Referencing does not publish on line comments about rogue tenants. I have seen comments removed by LRS when a landlord or tenant makes comments that could be considered slander . The only time you can make a personal comment about a person or tenants behaviour in public is when it has been proven in court.

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    There is a simple answer to this article you havequoted, “But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?" Firstly obviously the problem is serious enough for the 1000s of landlords and their agents who are joining our site, I believe the saying is "the proof of the pudding is in the eating” and regarding the question of data protection, we have registered with the ICO and covered the nessasery and required lawful registration of our data with them. And thirdly ARLA was a, name them and shame them formula which is wrong and detrimental to some tenants, Landlord referencing does not openly name and shame and its data is thoroughly checked against its landlords and is not a dangerous automated system that allows for mischievous and incorrect upload of tenants names and their details by rogue landlords its such a shame that people condem without knowing what its all about, maybe just maybe if we all thought about the people who suffer at the hands of bad tenats then we would not be so quick to put down those who try to help decent people to protect their property and income what has this Country come to.
    Sharon Crossland said:
    Here is the comment I posted on the actual site offering the service yesterday:There are a number of methods available to landlords seeking references for their tenants such as credit agencies, employers, family and friends but none of these will say how a tenant conducts himself, for example whether he pays his rent on time and the kind of lifestyle he has.Therefore this sytem operates on what the tenant doesn't say with the site stating that 'the previous landlord can give a one hundred percent unbiased and informative opinion as they have one to one experience in dealing with the tenant first hand'.What interests me the most about this service however is the fact that ARLA tried to create a central database of information on landlord/tenant behaviour, rent arrears, condition of property, etc to be shared between private landlords and managing agents. However, this was considered to be an intrusion into the privacy of both landlords and tenants. The Information Commissioners office said that the creation of such a system should be a necessary and proportionate response to a problem that is sufficient to warrant the creation of such an intrusive system.I obviously don't condone the actions of tenants that do nothing but trash places and deliberately fall into arrears because paying the rent is somewhere near the bottom of their priorities.But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?Miss Sharon Crossland AIRPMLeasehold Life
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    People are asking why the concept of this web site is any different to every other referencing site on the internet. This can be simply explained that Landlord Referencing is not about referencing against the information a tenant gives you, it is about taking a reference against the information that they don’t give you. Landlords Referencing gives voice to landlords to answer back to one sided legislation. Let us face it, no tenant is going to give you their last landlord if they know they have either ripped them off or damaged/destroyed their property.
    A good analogy to outline this - Landlord Referencing is like a chain link fence that is slowly locking together and linking landlords and agents as one across the UK. It is like a huge pool of information interlocking members together one by one, with Landlord Referencing just acting as the posts that keep the sections upright and rigid so that each link stays in situ as strong as the last, strengthening the security of the fence as it grows area by area.
    That is why passing on information to other landlord and letting agents and getting them to join is adding links and strength to the fence daily; every time one member tells someone and they become a member, another link is added and slowly but surely the fence will cover the whole country. When that is done you can imagine the hypothetical situation of passing an electric current through the fence from one end, electrifying the whole fence and thus securing the entire area it surrounds; Information that is passed amongst landlords and agents through LRS is the electrical current that will protect them and then once we have created this secure field all landlords and letting agents wont have to be subjected to the one law for us and one law for others which is what we have in place now. Although Landlords Referencing cannot change the law - cheats, con artists and scammers who destroy our property and steal our rents
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    Try again just make sure you are ticking the T&C box at the top of the registration page
    Susanne said:
    well i just tried to register and it would not recognise my email address......
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    'maybe just maybe if we all thought about the people who suffer at the hands of bad tenats then we would not be so quick to put down those who try to help decent people to protect their property and income.. what has this Country come to?'
    Er, Paul, at what point in my perfectly reasonable observations and questioning regarding Data Protection did I condemn or put you or your service down? I made it perfectly clear that I did not condone bad tenants and I would also note that I'm not the only one on this thread that raised the issue of Data Protection.
    You answered all my questions but I would have been more appreciative of them if you could have refrained from the righteous indignation that was all too evident in the above comment.
    Regards
    Sharon




    Paul Routledge said:
    There is a simple answer to this article you havequoted, “But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?" Firstly obviously the problem is serious enough for the 1000s of landlords and their agents who are joining our site, I believe the saying is "the proof of the pudding is in the eating” and regarding the question of data protection, we have registered with the ICO and covered the nessasery and required lawful registration of our data with them. And thirdly ARLA was a, name them and shame them formula which is wrong and detrimental to some tenants, Landlord referencing does not openly name and shame and its data is thoroughly checked against its landlords and is not a dangerous automated system that allows for mischievous and incorrect upload of tenants names and their details by rogue landlords its such a shame that people condem without knowing what its all about, maybe just maybe if we all thought about the people who suffer at the hands of bad tenats then we would not be so quick to put down those who try to help decent people to protect their property and income what has this Country come to. Sharon Crossland said:
    Here is the comment I posted on the actual site offering the service yesterday:There are a number of methods available to landlords seeking references for their tenants such as credit agencies, employers, family and friends but none of these will say how a tenant conducts himself, for example whether he pays his rent on time and the kind of lifestyle he has.Therefore this sytem operates on what the tenant doesn't say with the site stating that 'the previous landlord can give a one hundred percent unbiased and informative opinion as they have one to one experience in dealing with the tenant first hand'.What interests me the most about this service however is the fact that ARLA tried to create a central database of information on landlord/tenant behaviour, rent arrears, condition of property, etc to be shared between private landlords and managing agents. However, this was considered to be an intrusion into the privacy of both landlords and tenants. The Information Commissioners office said that the creation of such a system should be a necessary and proportionate response to a problem that is sufficient to warrant the creation of such an intrusive system.I obviously don't condone the actions of tenants that do nothing but trash places and deliberately fall into arrears because paying the rent is somewhere near the bottom of their priorities.But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?Miss Sharon Crossland AIRPMLeasehold Life
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    Your comment was posted on the Rat and Mouse not on the web site as you say, however I only answered your questions as you askedSharon Crossland said:
    'maybe just maybe if we all thought about the people who suffer at the hands of bad tenats then we would not be so quick to put down those who try to help decent people to protect their property and income.. what has this Country come to?'Er, Paul, at what point in my perfectly reasonable questions regarding Data Protection did I put you or your service down? I made it perfectly clear that I did not condone bad tenants and I would also note that I'm not the only one on this thread that raised the issue of Data Protection.So why the above comment?SharonPaul Routledge said:
    There is a simple answer to this article you havequoted, “But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?" Firstly obviously the problem is serious enough for the 1000s of landlords and their agents who are joining our site, I believe the saying is "the proof of the pudding is in the eating” and regarding the question of data protection, we have registered with the ICO and covered the nessasery and required lawful registration of our data with them. And thirdly ARLA was a, name them and shame them formula which is wrong and detrimental to some tenants, Landlord referencing does not openly name and shame and its data is thoroughly checked against its landlords and is not a dangerous automated system that allows for mischievous and incorrect upload of tenants names and their details by rogue landlords its such a shame that people condem without knowing what its all about, maybe just maybe if we all thought about the people who suffer at the hands of bad tenats then we would not be so quick to put down those who try to help decent people to protect their property and income what has this Country come to.Sharon Crossland said:
    Here is the comment I posted on the actual site offering the service yesterday:There are a number of methods available to landlords seeking references for their tenants such as credit agencies, employers, family and friends but none of these will say how a tenant conducts himself, for example whether he pays his rent on time and the kind of lifestyle he has.Therefore this sytem operates on what the tenant doesn't say with the site stating that 'the previous landlord can give a one hundred percent unbiased and informative opinion as they have one to one experience in dealing with the tenant first hand'.What interests me the most about this service however is the fact that ARLA tried to create a central database of information on landlord/tenant behaviour, rent arrears, condition of property, etc to be shared between private landlords and managing agents. However, this was considered to be an intrusion into the privacy of both landlords and tenants. The Information Commissioners office said that the creation of such a system should be a necessary and proportionate response to a problem that is sufficient to warrant the creation of such an intrusive system.I obviously don't condone the actions of tenants that do nothing but trash places and deliberately fall into arrears because paying the rent is somewhere near the bottom of their priorities.But is the problem serious enough to warrant the sharing of tenant information without the correct Data Protection checks and balances in place, especially if ARLA could not do so?Miss Sharon Crossland AIRPMLeasehold Life
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