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  • HMO & Multi-Lets

    Launch of HMO Compliance Week 2018



    Welcome to a brand new week of themed content on Property Tribes - "HMO Compliance Week" 2018.

    New legislation for HMOs comes into effect on the 1st October 2018 so we are counting down to that.

    To give the all-important detail on this topic, Property Tribes has teamed up with HMO legal expert David Smith of Anthony Gold Solicitors to create a raft of video content to educate HMO landlords as to their legal responsibilities.


    We have a really valuable week of content lined up as follows:

    Monday - Launch of HMO Week - overview of changes/how to find information

    Tuesday - Minimum room sizes/understanding licensing fees

    Wednesday - Mandatory licensing changes

    Thursday - Understanding management regulations/Rent to Rent HMO issues

    Friday - Who is responsible and when to apply for a licence/consequences of non-compliance

    The week is being powered by our legal partner, Anthony Gold Solicitors, where David Smith is a partner and Property Tribes would like to thank David for being our presenter.

    Please join us all this week for expert insight into being a compliant HMO landlord!

    SEE ALSO  -        Definition of "household" in an HMO?

    UP NEXT -            What is a Mini-Mo?
                
    DON'T MISS -       Video exclusive: Changes to HMO regulations

    NOW WATCH:

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    The National Landlords Association is concerned that local authorities are not prepared for, or are still unaware of, the mandatory licensing for HMOs.

    Richard Lambert, CEO of the National Landlords Association, said: “The Government made the announcement about mandatory HMO licensing in January, but we’re concerned that many landlords may not have applied for their licenses. We encourage all landlords to make sure they do so before 1 October to be compliant.

    “It may be that landlords thought there was a six-month grace period, as was originally proposed. This is not the case and we don’t want to see anyone committing an offence through ignorance.

    “We have been contacted by a number of our members who have tried to apply for licenses, but the local authority has purported not to know anything about it or simply didn’t have the systems in place to process the applications.

    “This is an unacceptable failing on the part of the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, which should have ensured all local authorities were up to speed with the changes. It’s disappointing that more consideration hasn’t been made for the significance of this change and the challenges local authorities face in implementing it.

    “Our advice to landlords who have encountered this is to apply for an HMO license using the existing process, even if the council hasn’t updated their forms.”

    Full/source article

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    Just a reminder that all the compliance changes we highlighted last week are now in effect as the new legislation starts TODAY!

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    A series of Freedom of Information requests has found that only a minority of local authorities have established the number of properties that need to be licensed under new HMO rules.

    Even fewer councils – only a tiny handful – know whether the properties would meet licensing conditions, for example, as to fire safety and new minimum room size requirements.

    As a result, thousands of HMOs could be illegal, exposing landlords and agents to fines and other penalties, and inability to serve Section 21 notices.

    Tenants meanwhile could face losing their homes.

    From October 1, the old HMO rules changed, and now apply to properties of any height where there are five or more sharers in two or more households.

    Previously, only properties of three storeys or more were covered.

    A 2008 Government report estimated there were 56,000 HMOs licensed under the old regime.

    These will automatically be passported over to the new arrangements, but the Government estimates a total of 160,000 properties could be covered by the new regulations and has given local authorities up to three years to identify them.

    Research carried out by Doncaster-based property investment firm Touchstone suggests that many councils will need all of this time, while meanwhile a large number of HMOs are illegal.

    Full/source article

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