X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Buy-to-Let

    Moral compass and basic humanity

    None of us have chosen to become landlords as a charity and all wish to improve our lot in life.

    The majority are dismayed at the endless legislation and bad press directed at us.

    Yet there are not infrequent threads in which a landlord bemoans their lot having been bought to book by a council.

    My personal view is well done that council, round here a property has to be especially poor to get their attention let alone any action. Short of a landlord letting a substandard property for nothing i have little sympathy for them.

    A common response on here is “what can be done as a bear minimum” i sincerely trust that all these people rent at levels that ensure that at the years end their property income is at minimum wage rates for each hour they put into it.

    Whilst there’s most certainly a differential between and LHA rate property and a luxury apartment, any rental should be dry, warm, safe and satisfy HHSRS. Without doubt there are very few properties that raise not a single criticism. BUT it’s a massive leap from there to an improvement notice.

    No decent landlord can be excused knowing their property has deteriorated to that degree ( even tenant damage should be known, if not acted upon during the tenancy) there is really only one piece of advice

    ”leave an industry you have no place in”

    Such landlords are why we have , selective licensing and a raft of other costs.

    As in the title,

    where is the moral compass and basic humanity

    Money isn’t everything.

    6
    0

    I guess the barriers to entry for btl were really low once upon a time.

    In the 1990s I bought far too many houses in London suburbs in really poor condition and then rented out rooms in them cheaply whilst I worked on them. In 1998/99 alone I bought 6 large houses whilst working full time as a 25/26 year old. I can't believe I was able to do that and nobody cared that I was massively overtrading and completely out of my depth.  They kept on lending 85% on houses that weren't fit to be let out.

    I moved full time into property and turned everything around but it has been the full time work of years and it is easy to see how some landlords now have bad properties from the good old days without ever having had any bad intentions.

    0
    0

    Whereas I bought an 11 bedroom house turned it into 4 flats as time and earnings allowed, full planning , building regs, fire alarm over and above requirements, nothing let until i had completion certs. Took me 3 years, split garden and did a new build , that only took 2 years.

    There is no excuse of “having no bad intentions” , drink drivers are shunned by society and most have no bad intentions. By all means take a chance , if you get away with it all well and good (so long as no harm is done) get caught , then man up and accept the downside.

    Is it any surprise the sector has the reputation it does and is such an easy target?

    0
    0

    Well, well done you, sounds good.

    I was just making the point that I can see how historically people were easily able to get in to BTL and right out of their depth. I bet a lot of the landlords with dilapidated properties now bought them several years ago. Nobody ever told me anything at the start and with hindsight I could easily have dropped the ball. Once I worked everything out I like to think I got everything up to speed, but things were very different 20 plus years ago.

    I agree that reaching the need for an improvement notice is bad, but I can also see how life happens to people and they can't cope and that surely must also include landlords right?  Properties go down hill very quickly, especially with bad tenants.  I am pretty full time looking after mine.  So if tomorrow I got diagnosed with something life changing or one of my loved ones does I could see how that could quickly make me a "bad landlord".  Just a thought.

    1
    0

    fully in agreement with you. Shame that many have lost their moral compass and basic humanity. I fear without this the future is bleak.

    0
    0

    If every landlord thought like you Philip then landlords wouldnt be despised by the majority of people...

    0
    0

    Gees not sure your going to like this   I consider myself a decent landlord yet due to having a flat in a close with other landlords the council keep threatening me with legal action because of other landlords in block . They all talk a good job but won't even invest £50 a month to make things better .

    So you can be a good landlord and still be prosecuted. I engage with council but they insist I pay for all repairs or be prosecuted. I have many times pointed out that it should be those that don't engage

    0
    0

    So long as your flat is in good nick from the door throughout and you’re a leaseholder with no interest otherwise in the freehold you’ve done what you reasonably can. However if you bought the flat in the full lnowledge that it was cheap because of the state of the building and are happy to benefit from reduced maintenance bills my sympathy evaporates faster than a vampire at dawn.

    My council insists there is nothing they can do to compell a leaseholder to maintain common areas or the exterior of buildings unless expressly expressed as solely a leasholders responsibility in the lease. This makes a mockery of selective licensing. Councils are none too shy with threats , have they actually taken any formal action against you? or is it a case of empty threats against the only person they can contact?

    0
    0

    "...A common response on here is “what can be done as a bear minimum”..."

    Is it a coincidence that this subject came up just after I posted the following question on another thread -

    "...What work needs to be done - and how much of it is absolutely necessary for the property to be liveable?..."

    To put my comment into context, my definition of 'liveable' takes into account, as the very minimum, ALL of the most up to date regulatory obligations that landlords are bound by.


    0
    0

    Good evening, no it was’nt your reply alone that prompted my post, but prior to the additional context ,my understanding of “absolutely necessary” was not favourable. But even then a property that has deteriorated to such a state is just not acceptable.

    0
    0