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  • Refurbish/Develop

    Planning permission

    When rehab is necessary, up to what extend planning permission is not required?
    For example, the main living room (ground floor) has been split some time ago and now the space needs to be joined back; the kitchen is to be moved to this living open plan space, very small bathroom located at the back of the house (next to existing kitchen) is to be moved to the first floor above the existing kitchen (currently small bedroom); an existing kitchen and bathroom need to turned in to a bedroom. Flooring need to be replaced too and all windows facing back and to the side of the house have to be replaced. All this work is to improve functionality and layout of the house. Bathroom and kitchen are in such a bad state, that need replacement anyway.
    Will I need a planning permission for all of this work or for windows only? How long this may take if required? Do I need architectural consultation/planning ? No structural works, external changes or additions will be done.
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    Thank you so much Richard,
    This is more than I expected.
    By the way, if it was you doing such rehab, what cost range should I expect for such project? More likely there will be some or even complete re-wiring and new heating system which probably ads a lot Smile

    Richard Greenland said:
    Tomasz,
    I am not a planning expert and you might get a more detailed reply from someone who is, but I have a builder's working knowledge of Planning.
    You don't normally require Planning Permission for these sorts of works, where there is no change to the over-all shape of the building (for instance an extension, or even a dormer window or porch, could need PP as they change the shape of the exterior of the building). Also any material change of use usually requires PP, such as converting a single dwelling to multiple flats, changing from commercial to residential use or vice-versa. You do not appear to be proposing any of these things.
    What you will need to get is Building Regulations Consent, through a different department at your local council offices. There is a fee to pay but provided you can meet the regulations you will not normally be turned down - unlike Planning. You will need BR consent to put in a new bathroom in a different room, for instance. There is also a rule which says that if 25% or more of the plaster is removed from the exterior walls, then they all have to be insulated to the standards in Part L of the building regs (my council accepts 50mm composite board of closed-cell phenolic foam insulation on a plasterboard backer).
    Very small works such as those you list can be done on a 'Building Notice'. This way you don't need a detailed spec. or drawings, which saves you money, but you do need to know about UK building regs. An inspector will call out after key stages have been completed to check that all has been done properly. I would consider doing a new bathroom on a building notice but I have a good working knowledge of BR. You might be better to go the Full Plans route instead. This way you pay an architect or an architectural draftsman to prepare a spec. and detailed drawings for the bathroom and for any other significant works. A new kitchen in a different location may also need BR Consent. Then the drawings and spec. get sent off to the council department with the appropriate fee, some amendments may need to be negotiated, then you can start work. The Full Plans route has the considerable advantage that all the important details are already agreed with BC BEFORE you start work, so there is less chance of you doing work which does not satisfy them and having to re-do it. They prefer it because they can assess it all in the comfort of a warm dry office and don't have to make on-spec decisions on a muddy building site.
    The knock-through between two rooms will need a spec. from a structural engineer if it involves removal of any supporting walls. They merely tell you what you already know, it’s £100 down the toilet, but BC insist upon it, so you have to do it. If it just involves removal of after-market panelling, then no problem. Note - contrary to popular opinion, timber walls can in some instances be supporting.
    Regarding windows, if you are not enlarging the openings in any way, or putting in new openings, there should be no issue here, so long as it isn't a listed building or in a conservation area. All you have to do is get the installation done by a FENSA accredited installer and you are covered.
    Rich
    Fed up with HIGH PROPERTY MAINTENANCE COSTS? Follow my weekly blog at https://pimlico-flats.co.uk/blog/
    Trading as greenlandcarpentry.co.uk and Absolutely Brilliant Properties.
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    Is this property Freehold or Leasehold? If Leasehold you wil need to obtain the Freeholders consent to alter the layout of the property and flooring.
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    Hello,
    Thank you Nick, Richard, Louise and Cathy,
    Now I have much better picture. I expected the costs to be around 25-30000 (sort of guts feeling), so Richard confirmed this. I will have a contractor on site this Wednesday to do it in more details.
    This is freehold and is not jet repossessed but is can be within 3-4 weeks if debt no cleared. Another problem now is to find an investor for JV or to source it. The house in question has real potential for profit if purchased at the most of 160000; FMV - 230-235000, gross yield 9.6% (calc at 155) with 1250 rent. High demand area.
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