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  • HMO & Multi-Lets

    Property with underpinning

    In answer to your original question, I would say only one company did the underpinning, Abbey Pynford. And the defect insurance guarantee you mention will run for 12 years.gertie owen said:

    Thanks for your help re my underpinned property. Abbey Pynford did the underpinning, and Oriel services did the Superstructure 2. I do have defect insurance guarantee from Abbey Pynford for the value of 52,394 and this is for any owner acquiring the property

    gertie owen said:

    Is it normal for underpinning to be done by two companies. The other company who did the Superstructure 2 was a company called Oriel Services, they are part of a company called Cunningham Lindsey. 

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    Hi Gertie,

     

    An underpinned property is known as a "PUP" in the insurance world :-) (Previously Under Pinned)

    The closer you are to the date of the work then the more expensive insurance is, with each year that passes following the work insurance will become cheaper. Usually after 10 years it makes no difference to insurance at all.

    The trouble with underpinning is lack of knowledge, as others have said it should really be stronger than an identical house that has not subsided and therefore a better investment. Richard's comment about getting something in writing from building control is good advice, IF it is not done correctly it can cause much more serious problems in other areas of the house (this is one reason insurance companies stopped underpinning willy nilly, a lot of cowboys appeared and created huge losses for insurance companies)

     

    Personally I would happily buy a properly underpinned house.

     

    Hope this helps.

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    Dear Richard

    I dont think they used the local council for building control, but they look like they used NHBC building control instead. I have a final certificate from them, and that is backed up with NHBC building control insurance. They did inform the local council. I have a letter saying they received full plans. Should thst be enought. I think all im missing now is the original report saying why it needed underpinning. I need this for the insurance company Richard Greenland said:

    You need a letter from Building Control (part of your local authority) to say that it has been completed in accordance with building regulations and to the satisfaction of a buildings inspector. Some Bld insps are independent these days and I'm not sure of the procedure if one of these was used. But to cover yourself I'd get the letter from the council anyway.
    gertie owen said:

    Hi Richard

    Thanks for getting back to me again. I had heard about Phil Martin, but not about Singing pig. I did get a final certificate from NHBC Building control services ltd. Is this enoughtgertie owen said:

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    Hi Kevin

    Thanks for taking the time to reply, everyone has been so helpful. As I am so new to property, this one especially has been a challange. I plan to ask for a reduction anyway for the risk in selling it on. As the general public are so scared of these properties. The property was left to the vendor, and he has messed me about for 3 months giving me no paperwork. So that will make me decide

    Kevin Reeves said:

    Hi Gertie,

     

    An underpinned property is known as a "PUP" in the insurance world :-) (Previously Under Pinned)

    The closer you are to the date of the work then the more expensive insurance is, with each year that passes following the work insurance will become cheaper. Usually after 10 years it makes no difference to insurance at all.

    The trouble with underpinning is lack of knowledge, as others have said it should really be stronger than an identical house that has not subsided and therefore a better investment. Richard's comment about getting something in writing from building control is good advice, IF it is not done correctly it can cause much more serious problems in other areas of the house (this is one reason insurance companies stopped underpinning willy nilly, a lot of cowboys appeared and created huge losses for insurance companies)

     

    Personally I would happily buy a properly underpinned house.

     

    Hope this helps.

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    I looked at buying an underpinned property a couple of years ago.  Unfortunately the section that hadn't been underpinned had started to move and I could get neither lending nor insurance on it.  The vendor had it insured, but no BTL insurer would touch it. I believe (and I'm no expert!) that when part of a property has been underpinned, all the guarantees only cover that section of the property, not the whole building.  This is what I was told by the structural engineer who did a report for me anyway.

    I would agree with other posters that you need to be 100% certain that you can get both lending AND insurance before you commit to buy, and to get that you will need the paperwork to be watertight.

    Good luck!

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