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  • Property-a-holics

    Rent Statistics

     

    The use and abuse of data governs the housing debate and the entire policy response. The housing supply numbers commonly used and, until recently, the housing need numbers bandied about, have long been wrong or misleading. Given the importance of rent — the ‘price’ that tells us whether demand for housing services is outstripping the supply — using the right measure of that is particularly vital.

    I suspect most followers of the housing debate in the press would agree with the statement: ‘the cost of renting a house has risen faster than general inflation and average incomes in recent years’. This is a common refrain among commentators, think tanks and campaigners. But it’s incorrect. The data being used to make the case isn’t up to the job.

    Lie, damned lies and rent statistics by Ian Mulheirn

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    Very interesting, thanks for sharing. So Shelter either don't understand or deliberately misuse statistics to deceive the gullible again. Should they still  have charitable status?

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    What a shame that the author is a 'former think-tanker and HM Treasury economist'. 

    Landlords and landlord groups should pull together and commission this guy to do a press release to blow the Shelter and Generation Rent rubbish out of the water.

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    Statistics, by their nature, are a best guess. They are based on representative samples, assumptions and averages which can be varied and manipulated in different ways.

    It seems very popular to present a belief or an argument and then back it up with statistics that appear to confirm it. It is illogical to treat statistics as confirmation without knowing and understanding the samples, assumptions an averages used, which we rarely get to see.

    The article highlights how misrepresentative statistics can be.


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    A good teacher must know the rules; a good pupil, the exceptions.

    Martin H. Fischer

    Other than the annual NLA questionnaire, I've never been asked by anyone about my views on LL'ing in the UK, or anything associated with it.

    Has anyone on here, just out of interest?

    Mind you, I long stopped believing anything I read in newspapers/from politicians a long time ago...

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    Not all statistics are guesses, but it is true one needs to be very careful when looking at ones presented by someone with a bias. I generally try to find the source, and really distrusr articles that do not give them.

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