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  • In the Spotlight

    Shelter not so anti-landlord after all ... ?



    I was surprised and pleased to see that Shelter have taken to recognising that there are good private sector landlords out there!

    In a new article on their website, they recognise the work of Alison, who houses Syrian refugees:

    "I got involved with a local initiative to welcome Syrian families to the UK. There was a shortage of supportive landlords willing to offer secure tenure at an affordable level, so we bought a two-bed house specifically for the scheme.

    We’re now hosting our second refugee family, who have just had a baby here. We also purchased a building in the centre of our new home town that comprises three flats and a shop. The shop has become a pay-it-forward café, and two of the flats are rented out at housing benefit level to people who’ve had housing difficulties, as part of a scheme run by a local charity.

    Last year I helped found a local Landlords Association, which among other things has revealed the difficult feelings that many of us have about owning additional properties when others have none.

    It has also given me confidence in the potential for property ownership to function as a form of ethical investment, at least until the whole economic system is turned on its head. The Landlords Association is part of a wider initiative called Fair Housing for Frome, whose activities include finding ways to support tenants and lodgers, providing emergency shelter for homeless people, setting up a Community Land Trust, and working to establish a community of tiny homes in the town."

    Full/source article 

    I am sure you will agree that Alison helps set a great example.

    Hopefully Shelter will product more of this type of content, showcasing ethical landlords.

    If you’re a landlord and would like to get more involved with Shelter, and/or share your landlord story,  get in touch campaigns@shelter.org.uk

    SEE ALSO  -         Boycotting Shelter is a bad move

    UP NEXT -             Shelter surveying landlords - take part!

    DON'T MISS -        What causes homelessness in the UK?

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    Shelter has a job to do

    We have a job to do and thats to provide good safe homes

    We have a common goal

    So we need to work with them I know some landlords have had a bad experience

    But that should not deter the Landlord community to build bridges not walls IMO


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    Learn Change and Adapt ?????

    All comments are for casual information purposes only. If you wish to rely on any advice I have given please ensure you obtain independent specialist advice from a third party. No liability is accepted for comments made.

    I agree that Alison has done an amazing job in looking after these people - but is this the level the PRS needs to achieve in order to get any credit whatsoever from Shelter?

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    That would outline the benefits of the PRS to shelter?

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    In relation to the headline suggesting that Shelter might be warming to landlords (supposedly in the PRS), I was merely saying not unless we were operating like this incredibly charitable person does.

    In my opinion, many of us provide good homes for people at reasonable/market rents and that should be enough for Shelter to acknowledge as being of benefit - without going to the extent St. Alison does.

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    Very commendable effort, however the article doesn't go into much detail on the risks and rewards of this investment - other than the feel good factor.
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    I see nothing supportive of landlords, it literally starts of saying there was a "shortage of supportive landlords" to house people with No Income, No Jobs and No Assets.

    It's been said many times that Shelter could solve housing issues for many, many people by taking on the risk (offer a deposit) that they want to shame landlords to do.

    It then moves on to outline as what this person is doing is "property ownership to function as a form of ethical investment". Which you can translate is that property investors who do not house non low-income families or refugees is unethical?

    Alison is doing a great thing, great she is taking action and wish her the best. Your typical property investor is not in it to do a great thing, its business, its investment, its maximising returns and lowering risk. Its' providing a good service to your customers so they stay and refer others.

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    _________________________________________________________________________


    My posts are not financial advice, just a rambling guy passing time on a coffee break.
    The team at Bespoke Finance offers advice, including Limited Company Buy-to-Let , HMO Conversion and Cheap Life Insurance.

    _________________________________________________________________________


    Agreed Adam,

    The responsibility to 'Do the right thing, provide Below market rent homes is that of Government - and because their failing miserably, Government is trying to shift the focus onto the PRS. Tenants and their so-called support groups need to wake up to this.

    For example, Tenant Fee Ban, Brokenshire announces ( spins ) that Govt have saved Tenants £260 M / year in Fees, - But, doesn't mention the excess amount above that , which rents will have risen to pass costs forward onto the customer.

    Government couldn't run a sweet shop, let alone the countries finances. But Govt fund Millions to Shelter that could go to Housing the Homeless. !

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    I’m not quite ready to accept that Shelter are anything other than an agenda-driven, landlord-hating and massively hypocritical organisation.

    But... but...

    Their rhetoric over the last few weeks has dialled down the landlord attacks in favour of ‘build more social housing’ and, whilst I think Alison is a ludicrously unrealistic and clearly liberal-minded landlord, she does at least have Shelter singing a landlord’s praise - something else that seems to be a breakthrough for them. The more supportive stories they put out like this the better, but I think its too early to call it a change of opinion.
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