X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Buy-to-Let

    Suspected Brothel

    I'm Interested in a Central London Studio Flat in a luxury development.

    There is a long lease in place (Nov 2016) and the tenant is paying £125/wk more than all other identical studios in the building.

    Access is very difficult and the concierge has mentioned there are frequently 'guests' coming and going and is doubtful that someone lives there.

    Any advice on how or whether or not to proceed appreciated.
    0
    0
    Don't ! Do you really want to get involved with criminal gangs ? Stear well clear unless your name is Soprano.
    0
    0
    Technically if it is only one woman using the premise for 'services' and she is working for herself then there is no law being broken. So long as she does not have a pimp and isn't soliciting on the streets etc. Interesting that she has been allowed to continue since 2006, I imagine from that it is a relatively discreet service. Probably more Billy Piper in Secret Diary of a Call Girl! But who knows.

    As it happens I was away only a couple of weeks ago skiing and one of the chaps I met in the chalet I stayed in said his best ever tenant was a call girl. She always paid on time and never caused him any trouble. The Office for National Statistics estimates the sex trade generated over £5 billion for the UK economy.

    None of this is an endorsement of your possible future tenant, just saying she a) might not be breaking the law, b) might be a nice enough person and c) may be a good tenant or might be a bad tenant with all sorts of other issues.
    0
    0
    I would steer well clear.

    I wouldn't want to be a beneficiary of proceeds of crime.

    You may also experience trouble with the police etc.

    Drugs and violence often go hand in hand with prostitution as well.
    0
    0
    (23-01-2015 07:13 PM)Vanessa Warwick Wrote:  I would steer well clear.

    I wouldn't want to be a beneficiary of proceeds of crime.

    As has been pointed out, there may not be any crime being committed, even if the tenant is a 'working girl'.
    0
    0
    I would say your suspicions are correct. I lived in a luxury Central London development about 15 years ago and thought it was strange that three ladies seemed to arrive at the neighbouring flat at around lunchtime and then the door buzzer would go on the hour on the hour especially Thursday and Friday afternoon/nights. I once asked on of the ladies what they did and she said events management (hehe).

    The annoying thing was that the door buzzer could be heard from our flat late into the night and often our buzzer would be rung by mistake. The funniest was when one of my colleagues rang my bell, I answered saying hello X what are you doing here, he realised his error and scuttled off very quickly. I genuinely didn't realise what they were doing at the time and when I spoke to him Monday he said he'd had the wrong address for a friend...

    Finally I tweaked onto what was going on. I went around all the phone booths in the area collecting the call cards and had a male friend call them. They were all to my neighbouring flat offering massage services. Now I had the evidence I contacted the lettings agent who was reluctant to get involved because they'd been such good tenants, paid months in advance etc etc. but after a few weeks of badgering them, threatening to call the police, confronting men as they arrived and the ladies, the lettings agent evicted them.

    The owner was furious at me until he saw the state of the flat. He was based out of London and was just pleased to have such great tenants. He'd never done an inspection. What a surprise he was in for. The place was trashed. The walls were yellow from cigarette smoke, the carpets were stained with oil and who knows what in big patches, the kitchen and bathrooms were in such a state. He had to completely refurb the flat. He thanked me in the end. I left soon after as men didn't stop ringing the door bell at all hours.
    0
    0

    East London based property developer, investor and speaker

    East-Eight.com

    Follow Me: Facebook Twitter Snapchat


    What a tale Nicole!

    This highlights the importance of mid-term property inspections, as this damage would have been flagged up earlier in the tenancy life-cycle.
    0
    0
    Hi

    If I were you I'd pass on this opportunity.

    The current tenant may be paying over the odds currently but it might end up costing you a lot more in the long run because the situation is not clear.

    No landlord should ever be in a position where they can't gain access to their property after giving the tenant a reasonable amount of notice. The property is YOUR investment and you need to know that it is being respected by having regular inspections/reviews.

    As an Inventory Clerk while working for an Estate Agent I came across this situation before. It was a basement flat in Chelsea, so not too shabby. The tenant had to pay 12 months in advance as she was foreign, she did this without a problem so the landlord and Property Manager were very happy. 7 months into the tenancy a package addressed to the basement flat was opened by another resident of building and it contained flyers offering adult services. This caused all the other residents in the building to start a process of trying to sue the owner and having them forcefully removed from the leasehold. I don't know if they were successful in the end but what I do know was that the owner found it difficult to rent the flat after the tenant was evicted because the other residents made sure that any potential tenant knew what was taking place in the flat beforehand.

    Concierge's really know their buildings and you should listen to what they are saying.

    Do you want yourself and your family associated with such a thing?
    Is it worth all the potential hassle you may receive from other tenants/leaseholders?
    Are you ready to risk a longer void period than necessary when the current tenancy ends?
    Why is the current owner selling?

    It is not just about the money, your investment to should be as stress free as possible and this sounds like trouble from the start.

    Peter Tuoyo
    Director
    Yellow Oak Inventories LTD
    Tel: 020 3713 4933
    0
    0
    Yellow Oak Inventories LTD
    Tel: 020 3713 4933

    Thank you for all your thoughtful replies.
    I will let you know if I proceed and if there is any discussion-worthy followups.
    Appreciated.
    0
    0