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  • Buy-to-Let

    Timber Frame - a no-no or the norm shortly?

    Looking to purchase a BTL/FHL; transpires is Timber-Framed?!

    Built circa 4 years ago.

    Any advise, pros-cons?

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    We have a timber framed house.

    Some lenders and insurance companies don't like them for some strange reason.  I would be interested to know why.  Ours is cladded in concrete weatherboarding that is very robust and does not require any maintenance.

    So my only bit of advice is to check in advance that your lender and insurance company have an appetite for this type of construction.  NatWest were a bit iffy about it at first, but agreed in the end.

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    Scotland has been building timber frame for decades with no issues.

    I have just (about) completed an 8 unit BTR timber frame construction.  No issues so far with arranging finance.

    Building will settle and some decorative cracks appear (normal and to be expected) but after 4 years it should be fine.

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    I just discovered via twitter, that the NHBC are running a webinar entitled "The complete guide to timber framed construction".

    NHBC webinars

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    Have a look at  this website - I don't know if they have an axe to grind but the page includes all the worries I would have about a timber frame. Timber frame rings the same alarm bells as steel frame for me.

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    Thanks for that link - it's a useful resource.  Here's a screenshot of the key issues surrounding timber-framed properties:


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    A new report into energy efficiency in homes is calling for sweeping changes in both new and existing homes.

    The UK Housing Fit for the Future report is set to have major implications for the entire residential property industry, including those who will be valuing and marketing homes in the future.

    The report in particular sounds a death knell for gas central heating.

    New homes, wherever possible, should be timber-framed and triple glazed, as well as have no gas.

    Full/source article

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    Timber frames now appear to be the norm for new builds in my area in NI. There was a bit of a stigma but I think that's changed. I bought my first timber frame built in the 80s a couple of months ago & its extremely warm. I did think twice but the new ones popping up everywhere gave me confidence. Only downside was that it was all drylined & wallpapered over - complete nightmare to remove after 30 years!

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