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  • Property-a-holics

    Tory leadership contenders - views on housing



    Our official news partner, Property Industry Eye, has curated all the Tory leadership contenders, and highlighted their views on housing.

    Here is their list:

    Boris Johnson

    Johnson may be the favourite to become Prime Minister, but he has said very little on housing or agency issues.

    He held plenty of shadow ministerial positions pre-2010 in the business and education departments and was Mayor of London between May 2008 and May 2016 and Foreign Secretary between July 2016 and 2018, but he has never had a housing brief.

    Johnson was accused of failing to fund social and affordable housing as Mayor of London

    His register of interests does show he owns a rental property that provides an annual income of more than £10,000.

    Boris has been a trending topic on Property Tribes for his claim that he will increase the higher rate tax payer threshold >>> Boris - raising higher rate tax threshold .  Another indication of his views is this >>> Boris calls for cuts in SD and CGT .

    Michael Gove

    Gove was shadow housing and planning minister between 2005 and 2007 when the Conservatives were in opposition, where he regularly spoke out against Home Information Packs. He showed his trademark enthusiasm to engage with his brief – for example, subscribing to Negotiator magazine, a nugget which the (now EYE) editor has stored away for possible future reference.

    Dominic Raab

    Raab has been one of the many MPs who have gone through the revolving doors of the housing minister’s office.

    He held the role between January and July 2018 before becoming, briefly, Brexit Secretary.

    During his short tenure as housing minister, Raab appeared to say and do very little about housing, aside from a few comments about scrapping Stamp Duty for first-time buyers and answering a question about the timetable for the letting fees ban.

    Matt Hancock

    The Health Secretary and former Culture Secretary has never held a housing brief or mentioned residential property issues in Parliament but has generally followed Government policy on issues such as the fees ban.

    Sajid Javid

    Javid was in charge of the Department for Communities and Local Government at the time that housing was made a cabinet issue and the department relaunched as the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government. He was Secretary of State for the department between July 2016 and April 30, 2018, before he became Home Secretary.

    Both these roles will  have given him experience of housing issues including Right to Rent, which falls under the auspices of the Home Office and is currently appealing a high court ruling that it is illegal.

    Javid oversaw the launch of the Housing White Paper in 2017 and once said in Parliament that “young people are staring into the windows of estate agents, their faces glued to them, dreaming of renting or buying a decent home, but knowing that it is out of reach because prices have risen so high”.

    He lets a house in London, earning annual rental income of more than £10,000 a year.

    Jeremy Hunt

    Hunt was Health Secretary and is now Foreign Secretary. He has not held a housing brief.

    He has a pretty impressive property portfolio, owning a half-share of holiday house in Italy and a half-share of an office building in London.

    Hunt faced criticism and a parliamentary standards investigation last year for taking six months to disclose ownership of seven apartments in Southampton through a 50% interest in Mare Pond Properties.

    He later apologised and faced no further action.

    Mark Harper

    Harper is a former chief whip but also worked as a minister for disabled people and spoke in favour of the Government’s Universal Credit rollout, which has been blamed by some for causing arrears and making landlords avoid renting to those on benefits.

    Andrea Leadsom

    Leadsom has never held a housing brief but has spoken up for Government policy on Stamp Duty reform and exemptions as economic secretary to the Treasury between 2014 and 2015.

    Esther McVey

    McVey has spent most of her parliamentary career at the Department for Work and Pensions, most recently as Work and Pensions Secretary, where she has worked on reforming Universal Credit so that housing benefit payments can be made on behalf of tenants directly to landlords more easily.

    Rory Stewart

    Stewart has spent a lot of time during the leadership contest posting videos of himself walking up and down high streets or parks meeting the public to discuss issues such as Brexit or social care.

    He has mainly worked in foreign, defence or rural affairs and is currently International Development Secretary and does not appear to have said anything in Parliament on residential housing, but would probably be happy to be asked if he can be caught on one of his walkabouts.

    Full/source article 

    Who do you favour as the new Tory leader?

    SEE ALSO  -          Are you preparing for "Corbygeddon"?

    UP NEXT -             Landlord Shuffle Part II - Boris in the mix!

    DON'T MISS -         Landlord death by 26 cuts

    NOW WATCH:

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    I'm only going to respond to the one that has the most chance:

    " Johnson may be the favourite to become Prime Minister, but he has said very little on housing or agency issues. "

    Probably just as well he hasn't said anything, as everyone in his party that has set targets previously has failed to reach them this side of the millenium.

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    Andrea Leadsom is anti-S24 so I like her for that reason alone. Although who knows how this’ll help were she ever elected leader or chancellor?!?!
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    God help us - what a shower just like the Tory party who have done nothing for the Landlord since they entered Govt.

    Moving to FHL as at least they do not attract S24 Tax currently and are not in the firing line.

    The likelyhood is an interim PM until Labour or the Lib Dems take over but no one has a kind word to say for Landlords

    currently but at least we would have a Govt that cares about the NHS, Education, Manufacturing, Finance and Joe Public who

    are all suffering at the hands of our current Govt.

    Osborne was definately the worst Chancellor we have ever had.

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    I am afraid to say that who ever gets elected will be so tied up with Brexit and the problems with the economy that any major changes to the housing market will be at the bottom of the pile. By the time they come round to dealing with the problems it will be election time and they will all be looking over their shoulders to get re elected. Any radical changes to the housing market will affect the voter base. After the election the Conservatives will become a minority party and side lined for years to come. Labour will be in the driving seat and landlords owning multiple properties will get hit hard as will all those owning second homes. We will see a property revolution the like of which we have never seen before.

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    Any candidate who talks up no deal deserves to be thrown out in the next round.

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    Any candidate who rules out no deal deserves to be thrown out in the next round.

    Fixed for you, free of charge!
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    It's all over bar the shouting.

    If the new PM does not bring forward a bill for Parliament to vote on, there is no deal to vote on and we leave by default on October 31st.

    Job done.

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    Is that right?

    If so, let's just do that and spend the next six months sorting out some extra capacity for the Port of Dover !
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