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  • HMO & Multi-Lets

    Trickle Vents In Double Glazing?

    I need to get new windows for a property.

    I've been advised to get trickle vents in the double glazing - saying that if the property becomes an HMO, then the council will look for trickle vents. I've looked at my council's HMO requirements, and it doesn't specify trickle vents.

    I understand that the law says if there are trickle vents already present in the windows, then the new windows need them. There are not currently trickle vents in the windows.

    However, speaking to the double glazing company, they say they can install trickle vents, but the windows can also be opened and locked part way to achieve the same thing. They say that they work hard to achieve a decent energy rating, but then when asked to drill holes for trickle vents, that ruins that energy rating.

    I'm interested to hear your views. Should I get them in the new windows or not?

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    Always worth getting them for the minimal extra cost if you are replacing the windows - one of the biggest issues for a LL is air circulation and therefore mould which will cause you more money in the long term. If the double glazing you have is OK then dont make a special purchase obviously.

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    Do you / your tenants notice much with the warmth / energy use of them? (Sorry, a bit of a novice with these things.)

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    Hiya, new homes have windows with trickle vents as a standard because you need ventilation to stop damp. Yes it reduces the thermal efficiency slightly but a damp mouldy room is much less attractive and a potential health issue. Go for ventilation?

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    We had just this problem. You need ventilation and some of our older properties had PVC windows with no trickle vents. Retro fitting is tedious and not so effective. We have students who in spite of warnings keep window closed  wet washing on rads hence back mould in corners. We have drilled a 107mm diamond core drill hole into the redundant chimney breast and fitted a small plastic vent. This is high up and not  fitted with a hit or miss cover ( always get closed!). Total success, in fact we are waiting to do another house next week when vacated. The council were a little difficult with a young lass with no common sense or understanding only what it says in the book but the older guy saw the advantages and approved it.

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    Thanks and very interesting. So to confirm (so I ensure I understand) your ventilation went into the chimney breast and not the windows? 

    That's very doable in a few of the rooms. 

    Brian

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    Directly into the chimney breasts , bit of fun finding them as they do not go quite where you think as they veer one side or the other to allow for the chimney on the above floors. We did pilot holes till we were certain. As they are high they are not noticed as lower level hit and miss vents are usually closed and even taped over by tenants. We lit a bit of paper and held the smoke to the vent which was drawn in very strongly to satisfy the HMO people.

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    This is very useful. I'll go check on this before taking a decision. Very much appreciated.

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    if they can be locked in trickle vent position then that complies.  but will tenants do this?  I would have the trickle vents as extra cost is minimal and shouldnt affect rating.

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    The vents we used were permanently open and are very much more effective than trickle vents. We are more concerned with effectiveness than show. Most retro fitted trickle vents are pretty poor.

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    dont know why this is a reply to me as it has no relevance to what I posted.  I never said anything about 'show' or 'retro'!!!!!

    anyway trickle vents can also be permanently open.  and trickle vents are more effective than a chimney breast vent as the ventilation is best by windows where condensation is most likely to occur.  and redundant chimney breasts should vented anyway.  so all in all I disagree with just about every you say.

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