X

Sign Up

or

By signing up I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Sign Up

Sign Up With Facebook, Twitter, or Google

or


By signing up, I agree to Property Tribes Terms and Conditions


Already a PT member? Log In

Log In

or


Don't have an account? Sign Up

Forgot Password

To reset your password just enter the email address you registered with and we'll send you a link to access a new password.


Already a PT member? Log In

Don't have an account? Sign Up

  • Refurbish/Develop

    Vetting Builders for treating raising damp

    Hi all, this is my first post as I am relative new to this forum, already read some of the articles and will posted the job on http://www.myhammer.co.uk and on mybuilder.com and see what happens.
    But I still have a number of questions relating to contracting Builders to carry some work, treating raising damp.
    Property is in Barnsley was build 1905 and is a 2 bed terrace that has signs of raising damp around the chimney and some in the kitchen,.
    1) Is it ok to threat the visible areas or is recommend to treat the hole house including areas that are not showing visible signs of damp. (The two quotes I have had one recommends treating the spots and the other recommends treating the hole house)
    Any suggestions on vetting the builder
    2) I am checking through their references, but one of them has been recommended to by the management company as they have carried out some work already for them is this enough or is there anything else I should check for?
    3) They say it is guaranteed for 10 years but not sure by who, if the build goes belly up, how can I check this out?
    4) They have tendered a price for the job should I if proceeding with them put it all down in writing and a time span for completion with a penalty clause is this recommended.
    Any thoughts
    Rgds
    Pat
    0
    0
    Hi Pat,
    I have refurbished over 100 houses and installed a DPC in the vast majority of them. In my experience if you are in the middle of refurbishing the house and the extra mess of a full DPC isn't much of an issue I would definitely do the whole house. For the small extra cost it is well worth it - I always do it. You don't mention if the walls are solid as opposed to cavity but judging by the age of it they may well be solid and so the DPC isn't usually as effective. To improve the situation I have always removed all the plaster back to the bare brick from the floor to at least 1 metre high and then replaced with a sand & cement render and the re plaster over top. This works much better than just injecting the liquid as as the moisture doesn't affect it the same. I do this for every property.
    I tried a few companies before deciding to purchase the DPC machine and the liquid myself and got my boys to do our own. You can't do this obviously so I would ask for more than one reference and check them out. The cowboys will attempt to riddle out of guarantees if there is a problem - citing other reasons for the rising damp as happened to me in the past. The cost of chasing them is more often more prohibitive. The guarantees that I have come across is usually attached to the liquid so I would again check this with the company. So definitely go for more than one reference and confirm validity. The job shouldn't take more than a couple of days - three at most to do even if they remove the plaster and render.
    One more thing, make sure they confirm that they are responsible for any damage caused to the neighbouring property (if terrace or semi). On more than one occassion my lads ahve gone through to the neighbour's house especially if solid walls. You don't want to be replacing/cleaning neighbours carpets now sodden with DPC liquid.
    Hope this helps, cheers, Lyndon
    0
    0
    Lyndon, Roberta,
    Thanks for your advise
    This is a property that I have owned for some time, and the damp has been getting worse. The tenant has given notice so I will try to get the job done once they leave.
    Do you recommend putting it all down on paper, i.e their responsibility for the damage with a time span for completion?
    Rgds
    Pa
    0
    0
    For the longest time there was a large ad in the Sunday Times concerning a Dutch solution to rising damp. Rather than injections and other barriers the focus was on creating airflow so the moisture was carried away from the building. Has anyone use the method?
    I agree with Roberta's point about finding the source and eliminating it. If there was little to no moisture there would be little to no rising damp. The build standard in the past might not have been right. The problem is greatly increased by a source of moisture that exceeds the normal level found in the soil.
    John Corey
    Follow me on Twitter -> https://www.twitter.com/john_corey
    https://www.ChelseaPrivateEquity.com/blog
    0
    0

    John Corey 


    I host the London Real Estate Meet on the 2nd Tuesday of every month since 2005. If you have never been before, email me for the 'new visitor' link.

    PropertyFortress.com/Events

    Also happy to chat on the phone. Pay It Forward; my way of giving back through sharing. Click on the link: PropertyFortress.com/Ask-John to book a time. I will call you at the time you selected. Nothing to buy. Just be prepared with your questions so we can use the 20 minutes wisely.

    Roberta,
    The Damage is general raising damp noting to do with the Tenants.
    Do any of you recommend for a job like this putting in place a contact with the builder?
    Pat Kenny
    Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/Taz106
    0
    0
    Hi Pat
    we have used Alpine Preservation Ltd twice. They have been trading for over 30 years. We found them very professional, reasonably priced and the initial survey was free. Check to see if this organisation have any operatives in your area and also check out their website https://www.alpinepreservations.co.uk
    Gail
    0
    0
    We are currently having some work carried out by https://www.petercox.com/.
    They provided us with a full damp report and explained that the surveyors report which showed damp on the chimney was actually condensation & didn't need treating.
    Their prices were reasonable and they were highly recommended.
    0
    0
    Hello Pat
    You will note from my qualifications that I am a CSRT surveyor. The CSRT qualification was launched by the BWPDA (British Wood Preservation & Damp Association) which has now reorganised itself into the PCA (The Property Care Association).
    If you Google the PCA I am sure you will find not only the recommended treatment for Rising damp but also qualified member companies in your area.
    In response to your question however my main concern would be the likelyhood of penetrating damp from the chimney stack perhaps caused by a lack of ventilation within the stack causing condensation to occur. The condensation damp would cause any residual soot in the flue to react aggressively and to migrate to the surface causing damp patches on the chimney breast. The method to eliminate this problem is to tackle the source of the damp by adequately ventilating the stack and then to remove all contaminated plaster. My preferred treatment in such instances is to coat the exposed brickwork with a tanking slurry, apply a key coat and then to plaster and skim. This type of treatment would normally carry a 20 year guarantee and if carried out by a PCA member the guarantee can be insured by payment of one single premium against the member ceasing to trade.
    Kitchen damp may be condensation so be careful not to be convinced it is rising damp!!I It may just be a case of ventilating the kitchen area? There is a test a PCA member can carry out as part of a survey. A small fee is normally required. A plaster sample is taken from the wall from various heights and a salt test analysis is carried out to test for chlorides and nitrates ground salts. If positive you are then aware that there is rising damp occurring!
    Please by all means look at https://www.dwcuk.com
    Malcolm
    0
    0
    Hi Malcolm,
    Great information in your post, thanks for sharing. It's great to have someone with your experience on here.
    Welcome to the forum.
    0
    0
    Hi Pat, This will put the Cat among the Pigeons but I have to say that Damp is usually caused by other problems and its generally believed Damp courses do not break down but damp is usually caused by other issues. I have come across soil,concrete bridgeing the DPC water penetration of brickwork and then running down to ground level (poor brickwork pointing) you could look up damp causes on the internet but not those listed by aftermarket DPC companies as they only want to sell product. I had a free damp survey on a property to appease a tenant as he had a condensation problem (lack of ventilation) fortunatley the DPC saleman sided with me on condensation being the main problem but still said the property wanted a DPC, I have a new tenant that opens the windows occasionally and we have no more problems!
    Its also worth telling you do not under any circumstances put concrete render and plaster skim over a solid brick wall that was originally covered with with Lime Plaster as this will compound the problem, another big issue is people who rip out wooden floor boards and concrete the floors this is a total recipe for a Damp disaster. Take a look at SPAB website about older buildings and how lime breathes and how older buildings work, incidentley its very interesting the dutch are curing damp with Ventilation something modern homes seldom get and something older buildings rely on. I have a 1750 cottage which had terrible damp in desperation I removed the concrete render and Thisle skim and then re plasterd with Lime Plaster this has cured 90% of the problem on this property. I used to be of the opinion put an injection DPC in every property I bought however there really is a much bigger picture and after spending lots of money on damp proof courses I am now of the opinion anyone will say its damp to sell you product and not point out the root cause. I could go on but just check the building for other reasons for the damp before you spend loads of cash. I hope this helps
    0
    0
    Thanks to everyone for all the good information its really opened my eyes to the potential problems that may be causing this.
    rgds
    Pat
    0
    0